career change

Shadia Al Hili - Various careers to Food Entrepreneur

“There’s no point telling our kids that they can be anything they want, if we show them we’re too scared to be what we want!”  

“In 2016, at the young age of 45, I reached my now or never moment.”

“I’m simply happier when I’m driving my own destiny - not being in the passenger seat of someone else’s dream.”

Overview of earlier career

At the age of 26 after finding herself a newly single mother and struggling to find a job after the Manchester bombing in 1996, Shadia began to sell shoes from the back of her car. Within days realised she was making a profit! 

After doing a basic Women into Business course, she launched the first ever independent shoe store in the famous Affleck’s Palace and from there, onto a stylish clothing unit. 

Five years later, Shadia spotted a gap in the beauty industry. Her Moroccan-born mother had taught her the artistry of threading as a young girl. 18 years ago, the popularity of the Kardashians saw this art trickling across to the UK. 

With zero beauty experience, she saw an ad in a glossy magazine suggesting Harrods 5th floor Beauty department were struggling to find therapists, let alone teachers who knew the art, to meet demand.

She called the Beauty Manager, secured an interview later that week and was employed on the spot! Commuting between both Harrods and the sister company in Harvey Nichols she quickly attracted a high-income, celebrity clientele who were hungry for the latest L.A. craze and would pay £50 for a 15 minute treatment. 

While she appreciated that being employed meant that her employer paid for beauty courses to advance her career, she struggled with restrictive, time-based employment rules and felt her life had become controlled. 

12 months later, even though she felt fearful about taking on sole financial responsibility, Shadia decided she had to take the plunge.  She set up her own beauty business, specialising in threading, with a beauty concession in one of the best hair Salons in Manchester (James Roberts) and shared their red-carpet-loving clientele. 

Her reputation saw her faithful clientele follow her and the business evolved to teaching others the art of threading. 

Once again, she was fully in control of her time. Even though Shadia understood that Saturday was the busiest day for a beauty therapist, she refused to work on Saturdays. Weekends were reserved for her kids - to watch her son swimming or to take her daughter to dance classes. 

The trigger for change? 

“One day I was making Ful madamous - a fava dip which is a favourite staple in the Middle Eastern diet. It was one of the many dishes my parents introduced me to as a kid growing up. 

I made a fleeting comment to my sister wondering why it wasn’t available to buy ready-made.  

Something triggered.

It was a lightbulb moment. 

But, this time it felt different. I truly believed this was my calling in life. With only one problem:I knew NOTHING OF THE FOOD WORLD!

First steps? 

I kept working in my beauty business (3 days a week) so that I could finance and test the new business, Cuzena, from home (2 days a week).  I did that until I couldn’t keep doing both...and stay sane! 

My ex-clients, many of whom had become great friends, implored me not to change career. 

People around me could see that my life was financially settled, so it didn’t make sense to them. I was fully booked everyday, weeks in advance and couldn’t take on new clients.  I was the one-man-band providing for my children and taking them on lovely holidays. So, financially, others didn’t think I should rock the boat.  

It wasn’t about the money. 

I just felt I had more to give. 

I owed it to myself not to stay stagnant just because it was easier. 

I needed to know who I could be. 

I wasn’t done with my life story. 

I knew I had more to give. 

I just didn’t know how I could truly do it or where to start. I knew nobody in the food industry let alone the food world! 

I think other people’s fear of failure can easily influence you and make you want to ‘stay safe”.  It took time to convince myself that I could and should do it.

Then I decided...F*ck it, I’m doing it! What’s the worst that can happen? I could go back to doing brows and waxing fanjitas until I’m 65!....that was the worst thing that could happen...I could always go back! 

In 2016, at the ‘young’ age of 45, I reached my now or never moment. 

I had to know IF I could really introduce this amazing food to the world. 

I re-mortgaged my house and got the cheapest, shared office I could find as a base for the dream to become my reality. 

I’d never owned a laptop. I couldn’t even copy and paste. I’d always been creative but I was not techy! I got free lessons at Google and before long I was in the kitchen, sending emails and dropping samples to deli owners who were potential clients!

Ful madamous was not on the British market. It hadn’t been done but, like everything in my life thus far, that wasn’t enough to deter me!  

I see Madamous, just like Houmous, which was introduced to the mainstream by Waitrose. I’m doing the same with Madamous.  I know that sounds ambitious but if your dreams are not scary then you have to figure out why they are not scary enough! 

Shadia 2 products.png

What Shadia learned?  

  • Dreams will remain dreams until you take action. 

When you take action the road opens up to you. You must take action and those daily steps will take you closer to whatever you want. 

  • Don’t fear failure - learn from it instead.  

So what if you fall flat on your face? Get up! Next time you’ll know to put your hands down first! And you’ll never have to live with the regret of not trying.

  • You have to believe it’s possible and not be deterred just because it’s difficult. 

There was a time when you couldn’t read this line. You were probably pushed to invest time to learn to read. That’s a clear example that your ability improves only when you put the time in. You cannot undo your ability to read - it’s yours forever. 

Growth in any area is success and that is yours forever!  

  • People say ‘if it was easy everyone would do it’. I think that’s such BS!

If it was ‘guaranteed’ everyone would do it. There are millions of people that work hard for years in jobs they hate - which is far from easy but a monthly wage is guaranteed!

That’s the difference between those who choose to walk their own path. It’s not guaranteed to work or be successful.  

The success for me lies in your ability to take action even if success is not guaranteed..

  • Beware the employment trap.

Employers see your value and ensure they tie you in with ‘golden handcuffs’ or more training. You see it as personal growth, they see you as a commodity who can deliver more in the same hours!  

Either way you’re now invested too and legally bound to stay for a period of time, even if your not happy! It's a trap!

Choosing when and how you work is...priceless!’

  • Know your worth. 

Believe me, if you set your own rules or boundaries, your customers will adhere to them

In the beauty business, I knew my worth. I never worked on Saturdays even though it was the busiest day. 

I never lost a client because they made time to fit into my schedule.  Even if I did lose a treatment fee, it certainly wasn’t measurable against the quality time I gained ensuring family time at weekends was not compromised. 

  • A pay cheque to me is as addictive as crack but we accept it like sugar!  It grips you for years and convinces you that you can’t do without it. But, you can drop the habit! 

The security of a monthly cheque is truly addictive. 

The comfort of a regular monthly pay packet creates a false sense of security. Worse still, you just do your job and go home without knowing how great you are. Or what you’d be actually capable of achieving if you gave it everything! 

People are so fearful of losing their stability they convince themselves they’re better off.  Even though they are largely controlled 5 days a week with time restrictions: when they start; when they eat; and when they are “allowed” to go home.  To me that’s an open f*ckin prison!

  • Becoming self-paid is exhilaratingly addictive. 

Once you’re ‘self paid’ you’ll never want anyone to pay you again…they won’t be able to afford you! 

You get to control and choose how you spend your day. 

You work hard but on your own terms. 

  • Don’t try to reinvent yourself. 

Be authentically you or the mask will slip. It’s ok if you don’t know everything in your new field - you don’t have to! Life is a learning process.

  • The only reason we don’t follow our ambitions, ideas or dreams is because of FEAR.   

It’s so easy to think about what we could lose that most people never consider what they could gain. 

I read a lot. I get inspired by people who have the courage or tenacity to travel a path less travelled. I know, it’s scary but necessary, if you want to do something amazing!

In building Cuzena, I knew it had to be different. I wasn’t going to be a one-man-band this time. I want to create a legacy brand, to build something incredible, to make a difference employ people and be the best example I could be to the two people I love most, my children Eilsel and Zena.

  • Why not me? 

Sometimes, women especially, talk themselves out of their best ideas.  

For instance, if no one in the market is doing what you want to do, we can think that there must be a good reason that no-one has done it and conclude that there is no point of trying.  That’s just fear of failure talking. 

  • I’ve trained myself not to be afraid but I work at it every day. 

I’m as scared as everyone else but I start every day getting my head in the best place to perform and to reduce my fear. 

I always start with gratitude for my health and the health of my family. I use powerful affirmations, meditation, journalling, exercise and gratitude to help me. 

I also pretend I’m living my last day as often as possible. It pushes me beyond my fears of rejection. On the days when life gets too hectic to practise, I’m less productive.   

  • Grow a pair! 

Accept that failure is part of the journey. Getting up after every fall allows us to grow and get better.  I’ve experienced lots of failures in front of many and plenty of “I told you so” moments. 

But the only opinions that matter to me are from the two people I brought into this world. I am their example.  There’s no point telling them they can be anything they want if I’m too scared to be what I want! 

  • Some days are bloody tough!

The road is full of tough setbacks, knockbacks and many lonely hours! However you control your own time and to me that’s everything. You owe it to yourself not to live a life of regret, wondering ‘what if’ had you just had the courage to try!

  • The glory moments happen in the dark.   

The reality of owning a business is that you work harder and longer hours than most people do in jobs. You don’t have a boss to congratulate you when you do something well (or remind you that you missed a target!)  But it’s all worth it. 

Self employment empowers you in every facet of your life. It speaks volumes that you are a person who had the courage to act which shows belief in yourself. 

If you can go to work everyday, you better believe you’ll show up for yourself everyday with gusto!

On the days you just don’t have the resolve that's ok too, because we are human and sometimes life just gets in the way...your A game will come back.  

  • It’s about the journey not the destination. 

I set out to put Ful Madamous (the fava beans dip) on the map and available to the mainstream. I have succeeded in doing that. 

Our first big launch was in Whole foods and then Selfridges. We have many independents in the pipeline since getting a national distributor listing.

We’re in talks with a major retailer which is kind of unbelievable really.  

I just got my first unshared office and have employed three people for the first time. 

How it feels on the days when Shadia knows she has made the right decision?

It feels right! Satisfying. It’s motivating having no one to answer to.  

I love the freedom of not being controlled. 

I feel like I owe it to myself to see how far I can go. 

I’m simply happier when I’m driving my own destiny - not being in the passenger seat of someone else’s dream. 

It has stopped being about now and is about building something for the future.

Regrets?

None!

I wish I’d gone for it sooner, although I’ve reached a time in my life when I believe everything happens for a reason. 

I truly believed we arrived at the right time - people want to go back to healthy eating, there’s a rise in veganism and plant based eating there’s so much understanding of the benefits of eating pulses etc perhaps the stars were aligned for me to launch Cuzena. 

If you’d like to find out more about Shadia and her business Cuzena, contact her here:

Buy their goodies:

Stockists: Whole foods, As Nature Intended, Selfridges, Marigold, Cotswold Fayre.

Twitter: @cuzenabrand

Instagram: @cuzenabrand

Facebook: @cuzena


Other career change stories you might like:

Lou Kirby - Project Manager to Publisher & Life Satisfaction Coach - simultaneously.

“We gain confidence by doing things.  And that’s how we change our comfort zone - by stepping out of it.”

“I have my health and I have friends - some of whom have been very ill.  That’s a big driver for me...to be in charge of my own destiny, doing work that I’ve chosen to do.”

Lou Kirby.jpg

Overview of earlier career 

My background is in business project management and I worked at Microsoft for a large part of my career.  I looked after teams in various parts of Asia and South America so did a lot of travel which I loved – such a great way to see the world! 

The trigger for change? 

After the kids came along I couldn’t do the travel, so I resigned and secured a job locally 2 days a week. 

There was lots of change around this time.  Becoming a mum had a huge impact on me and my own mum passed away in an accident when I was pregnant. 

I had also hit my 40’s and felt this loss of identity and loss of confidence. I started to question what I wanted out of life too!  Was I doing what I wanted to do? Had I achieved what I had set out to achieve etc?

I’d always been interested in women’s confidence and thought I’d write a book about it - so I did. And sent it to a publisher. They really liked the content but told me I needed a platform before they would consider publishing it. 

 I began to talk to lots of different women and realised lack of confidence affects so many of us.  And I really wanted to do something about it!  

Another trigger for change was the prospect of regret, later on in life.  There were still so many things that I wanted to do and wanted to make sure that I actually did them!

These were all the drivers for me in setting up Woman Ready.

First steps

Working 2 days a week has given me the time to work on my other job - the platform I created (womanready) on the other days of the week and also be around for the kids. 

I spent a little time each day in the beginning learning what I needed to know: How to set up a website, how to do social media, how to get a little PR...everything. I also trained and qualified as a coach through The Coaching Academy. 

My end goal is to create a hugely successful platform and publish my book.  In the meantime, I’m building Woman Ready and focussing on my coaching business.  Our mission is to help women to recognise their potential, embrace who they are (as they are) and believe in themselves more. 

Lou Kirby 3.JPG

What Lou learned

  • Don’t give up the day job!

That’s my biggest learning.  Setting up Woman Ready has taken a lot of time and effort and initially you make little or no money. 

I was in a position where I had to change jobs however if this hadn’t been the case, I would have tried to juggle my ‘paid work’ with my new business for longer.   

  • Work-life balance is hard when you are juggling family, a job and a business. 

When it’s your own business, it can become all-consuming.  I could work 24hrs a day.  I try to work in 30minute windows with regular stops. I then stop to pick up the kids from school and try to spend some quality time with them (but do sneak on my phone a bit!). It's a tough one to juggle! 

  • Perfectionism is crippling 

Luckily, I get better at not focussing on perfectionism the busier I get!

  • Be real. 

You need to be authentic. If I make a mistake - I just own up, say sorry and move on. 

  • Nothing happens overnight. 

Don’t get down-hearted when you’ve posted your first tweet and no one notices. It’ll happen but recognise that it just takes time and persistence. 

  • Putting yourself out there is bloody hard but necessary. 

In our heads, everything is worse thant it is in reality. I recently did my first panel discussion and of course I was nervous. But once I got going it was fine.  I even enjoyed it!

  • It’s hard to have a career confidence and children. 

Years ago before the kids arrived, I had a great job, travelled the world, led meetings, gave presentations and got really confident doing all of that.  When I stopped doing those things, I lost confidence.  My comfort zone shrank - temporarily.  

  • Your comfort zone shrinks and enlarges all the time. 

You can learn how to do anything, if you want to.

Before I created Woman Ready, I was not a techie and had no idea how to design a website.  I didn’t know a thing about PR, had never written a blog post or published anything but now I work on all those things all the time. We gain confidence by doing things.  And that’s how we change our comfort zone - by stepping out of it. 

How it feels on the days Lou knows she has made the right decision?

Some days you have to just trust your own feelings. Some days, I just go with what I feel and do what feels right.  That’s confidence and I’m getting more of it each day.   Sadly, as women, I think we often look too much for approval from others.

I just have to keep telling myself that I’ve got forty eight years of life experience and twenty-five years of work experience!  

I have my health and I have friends - some of whom have been very ill.  That’s a big driver for me...to be in charge of my own destiny, doing work that I’ve chosen to do. 

Regrets?

If someone had told me it would take me 4 years to get to where I am, would I do it all again?

Mmm, I don’t know.  I’ve very stubborn (my husband calls me pig-headed!) but I’m still totally passionate about helping other women feel as confident as they possibly can. 

Lou Kirby 2.jpg

Find out more about Lou

https://womanready.com

email: lou@womanready.com

Instagram @womanreadyblog

Twitter @womanreadyblog

Pinterest @womanready

Facebook @womanreadyblog

Other career change stories you might like:

Stephen Hall - International Teaching Career to Food Entrepreneur

“When someone I don’t know sees me at a trade fair and shouts over to me ‘I’ve tried your balls and I like them!’ It’s funny and satisfying!

“There is a smile in my belly! It feels right. It feels positive.”

“Whilst I was thinking about next steps, I was in the kitchen cooking and making healthy snacks for my children. People were always saying that I should sell them so  I decided I would give it a go .” Stephen Hall

“Whilst I was thinking about next steps, I was in the kitchen cooking and making healthy snacks for my children. People were always saying that I should sell them so I decided I would give it a go.” Stephen Hall

Overview of earlier career.

Stephen has always been motivated by making a difference.

After graduating, he volunteered on a teaching project in Lesotho, Southern Africa for two years not really intending to teach for a career; but discovered he loved it. After a short spell teaching English in Poland, he returned to England to do his post-graduate teaching qualification at Cambridge. Afterwards, he taught at Kings’ School in Grantham, where he met his wife.

Stephen and his wife both then spent two years teaching in Malawi which inspired him to complete a Masters in Development Economics, but subsequently found that he was either over-qualified or under-qualified for his desired career change. So, he decided to continue his teaching career.

After various experiences, he ended up as the Head of English at a boarding school and absolutely loved the mix of pastoral work and teaching. It was the pastoral focus that led him to becoming a House Master, responsible for 50 plus teenage boys.

A clash in philosophies between himself and a new Head Master over a number of years, combined with working longer hours than was sensible took a toll on Stephen’s physical and mental health.  He tried returning to the classroom, but this led to further panic attacks. So, at the end of a very long road, Stephen walked away from his teaching career and decided to set up his own business.

Utilising his knowledge of the Education and Teaching sectors he worked on setting up an online tutoring system for International Students. After 6 months working on integrating two systems, the technology didn’t work as well as he’d hoped and he was forced to walk away.

First steps?

“That failure hit me hard and after a few months I got a job working for somebody else. Ultimately though, I realised that I needed freedom and autonomy to thrive.

Whilst I was thinking about next steps, I was in the kitchen cooking and making healthy snacks for my children.  People were always saying that I should sell them so I decided I would give it a go.  

I went into create mode and set up lots of snack tasting sessions in my kitchen.

I started to research the market for healthy snacks and sought advice from the local Chamber of Commerce who were excellent and I set up conversations with friends of friends who had built their own food businesses.

What Stephen learned?  

  • Simplify your ideas

You can get caught up in new ideas, new recipes, new markets to attack.  For instance, I ended up being interviewed for Countryfile after trialling some high protein brownies made from crushed up crickets!  It was such an interesting experiment but most ideas need to start simple.

  • Seek advice from others in the industry.

For example, a mother of an ex-pupil had built up a successful “bottom-bursting puddings” business, selling into all the major supermarkets and gave me some great advice that saved me time and energy.

  • Joining on-line food forums would have saved me time and energy if I’d found them sooner.

These have been invaluable to me. Forums like The Food Hub, Lifestyle Kitchen and The Foodpreneur Coach Generally speaking the food start-up community is a really supportive one and people are willing to give support and advice.

  • Be honest and get help quickly with the things you struggle with

Trying to do every single thing yourself is tough.  For instance I really struggle with accounting and decided to get help. I chose a Virtual PA who can not only help with accounting details but will be able to help with research and other projects in the future.  

  • Grow your network

Over time I have developed an incredible network of food business people locally from large company owners to small artisan producers. I found, with only a few exceptions, that everyone has opened their arms to me and is more than happy to offer advice and help.  

I’ve had conversations with people I respect who’ve challenged my thinking which I have found invaluable. They’ve helped me consolidate my thoughts and make better decisions.

On occasions, I need to find someone with a special skill and I’ll end up getting introduced to the perfect person at a trade fair or networking event..

  • Go with your gut instincts!

I’ve made mistakes that have cost me a great deal of time and energy by not trusting my instincts.

If it feels wrong, it’s probably worth listening to those instincts and probing more deeply. One of the best things about being your own boss is that you make the decisions - so you can say no and walk away!

  • Protect your IP

I’ve almost had my recipes stolen on a collaboration that didn’t work out.  I’d have been stuffed if I hadn’t set up ip protection and non-disclosure agreements from the early days.

  • Branding and marketing are important but make sure you believe that your product can justify itself financially.

I’ve made some difficult decisions on products that I’ve invested a great deal of time and resources in but they just didn’t stand up financially.

So, I’ve designed and researched new products on the back of both flavour, gut instinct AND financial insights.

  • Good is good enough

Start selling your product as soon as it is good - not perfect.  That way you can be nimble and make changes as you go along, based on customer feedback.

How it feels on the days when Stephen knows he has made the right decision?

There is a smile in my belly!

It feels right.

It feels positive.

I’ve been diagnosed with PTSD so there are days when my brain and my body conspire and tell me to stop but I don’t want to; because Bakes and Balls is important to me.  It’s mine and it’s a part of me.

When someone I don’t know sees me at a trade fair and shouts over to me ‘I’ve tried your balls and I like them!’ It’s funny and satisfying!

I love the feeling that my healthy snacks are solving a problem in a family and giving them viable alternatives to what’s on the market (in the free from ranges) that actually taste great.”

I’m excited about the new Frocolate truffle and spread ranges which we’re launching.

Regrets?

Occasionally I meet up with an ex-pupil who might be in their 20s or 30s and they tell me what they enjoyed and liked about my teaching; which texts they still remember (it is often the more risque sections of Chaucer’s ‘The Miller’s Tale’ where Nicholas’ bottom is branded; or the more gruesome parts of Webster’s ‘Duchess of Malfi’.

But it is also really touching when ex-pupils tell me why I was an important influence on them. I do miss my teaching time, but I couldn’t go back to it.”


If you’d like to find out more about Stephen and his business, contact him here:

Buy their goodies: www.bakesandballs.com

Twitter: @BakesandBalls

Instagram: @BakesandBalls

Facebook: .facebook.com/BakesandBalls/


Some other career change stories you might like:

Michael Owen - Business Communications to Fashion and Publishing.

“If we live for 1000 months, we will be 83 years old when we die.  When I decided to make my change I had lived about 600 months.”

“We were living a life of shoulds. We were doing what we thought we should. What society suggested we should do. And I wasn’t sure that the work we were doing actually mattered. I was rudderless. And worse than that - purposeless.”

Michael Owen - after he stopped living “a life of shoulds”.

Michael Owen - after he stopped living “a life of shoulds”.

Overview of earlier career

I founded four business communications companies over 15 years or so. Running concurrently, they turned over about £1.25 million, employing 30 people at their peak. I think we were well respected by most people as clever and innovative. We won 70 awards around the world.

The trigger for change?

The companies were doing well. My partner Lisa worked inside the businesses with me. We had nice cars and bought the picturesque 5 bedroom house we’d imagined. It had a nice big garden of course. With one of those gates that opened when you pushed a button. All very showy and, as we soon found out, all rather unnecessary and vacuous too.

We had everything we wanted.

But it was the wrong everything.

Within 6 months, we’d split up.

We were living a life of shoulds. We were doing what we thought we should. What society suggested we should do. And I wasn’t sure that the work we were doing actually mattered. I was rudderless. And worse than that - purposeless.

I had to dig deep to decide whether I was working with the right kind of clients at the Business Communications agencies. Was I really helping them do what they needed to do? Or was I just servicing a million pound overhead?

Lisa and I got back together. And eventually I realised that I wasn’t doing the work that I was supposed to be doing. As I’d got older, I had met more and more people who weren’t doing work that they were supposed to be doing - people who were stuck. And I had become one of them.

What was it that I was born to do?

I had become part of that same problem. I was not doing what I felt I was born to do.

Quite suddenly, at the age of 45, I decided I didn’t want to be part of that problem any more. I wanted to become part of the change instead.

Discovering which direction

I didn’t know how to do work that mattered in the beginning. Or which direction to point at. So I waited.

I closed all my businesses within a year. And spent 3 months or so thinking.

In the far distance past, I was a creator of furniture and an interior designer. In my teens and early twenties.

When I ran the agencies, I ran creative processes and built creative teams.  But I wasn’t being creative at all. I’d become a formulaic business man. And formulas bore me, big time!  I knew I needed to be creative again.

Another catalyst for the direction of change was Claire who lived up the road from me when I was fifteen.  I couldn’t speak to Claire unless I was wearing my special T-shirt.  It had the power to transform my confidence. That was key to my direction change.

I had always wanted to create clothing. But in a world where 70% of all clothing is burnt or buried within a year of it being made, why do we need more clothes?

I understood that what we wear has the power to change how we feel and change what we do.  Certain clothes make us stand taller, walk with more confidence and do amazing things.

I decided to create classic, beautiful, exceptional clothes to help people do amazing things.

A ‘buy less, buy better’ brand.

“Imagine a clothing brand whose purpose was to create confidence in the wearer…” I thought.

And Always Wear Read was created.

Michael “Time is running out. Ours is just a visit. Decide what to do with your remaining months.”

Michael “Time is running out. Ours is just a visit. Decide what to do with your remaining months.”

First steps

I found the best makers who make for the best brands in the world and got them to fall in love with my vision.  

I wanted clothes that would last many, many years. And I wanted to support them with a repair service. They saw me as adventurous and they liked my stories.  These makers make for Gucci, Louis Vuitton, Burberry - and me.

I chose to have red in every item to show off the exceptional craftmanship (it’s easier to see the top edge of a belt polished blood-red and is a nightmare to make) and it’s also the colour which is associated with confidence and the colour that the human eye sees first.

The colour red sat at the heart of our story.

Next Steps

The brand is now worn by Idris Elba and Will.i.am amongst others. Ralf Little owns the Always Wear Red business with Michael.

The brand creates amazing caps, hats, scarves, ties, pocket squares and socks.

Our sock maker makes for the British royal family. The material for our flat caps is woven in Yorkshire, and the caps themselves are hand made in Yorkshire.

Between 2015 and 2018 I mastered many items within the man’s accessories category.

And in 2019 to 2020 I am changing again. Morphing. Into a gender neutral brand that creates only amazing hand knits.

I have found the piece of clothing I love. So from 2020 I am focusing on doing one thing - really well.

What Michael learned?  

  • Lifestyle changes aren’t the end of the world

Lifestyle changes can, in fact, be the start of a new world. A much better one.

We definitely have less stuff.  When we decided to sell the big house we discovered so much stuff that we didn’t need.  I’ve always loved clothes but am not sure I appreciated them as much as I do now. When we were decluttering and getting ready for the move, I found two pairs of the exact same All Saints trousers in the loft that I didn’t even remember buying.

Embarrassing. But true.

  • Always have a crazy, unusual side project.  

It makes other things in your life seem less crazy when you do this.  50odd.com is my crazy project where I promised myself I’d write a decent blog story every day for ten years. From the very day that I was 50. That commitment was definitely a bit crazy but it reframes what “crazy” means and makes me braver in other areas of my life.

50odd.co.uk is so called because, when I started it I was 50. And because I’ve always been odd. Perfect!

  • Time is running out. Ours is just a visit. Decide what to do with your remaining months.

At the heart of 50odd.co.uk is the notion of 1000 months. If we live for 1000 months, we will be 83 years old when we die.  When I decided to make my change I had lived about 600 months. If I was average, I’d have 400 left to live and I had to decide what I wanted to do with those months.

Men live to 80 years in the UK (960 months). Women live to 86 (1032 months).

  • Decide if you are the hero of your story, or if somebody else is.

I chat to lots of people who say that they can’t make a change because they have a mortgage to pay. Or because they like their two or three holidays a year. This is fine. But, mostly, we cannot have things all our way. If we decide to let our landlord or our mortgage provider be the hero of our story then, of course, we can’t be the hero. They are.

I imagine that on some people’s tombstones it will say “Here lies Ben. A man that never realised his true potential because he chose to be led by his mortgage payments.”  Life is short. Lead; or be led.

  • Consider what your children would wish for their Dad

When our daughter Izobel came along two years ago, I found myself wondering what she would want for her Dad in the future. A dad who was living a life of shoulds (and had all the trappings of “success”) or a Dad who was doing work that mattered? To him. And to others. I chose the latter.

  • Find a new tribe

I wouldn’t have made it this far without the help and support of my new, more adventurous and tuned-in tribe. They understand the stresses and strains of being pioneering. Doing things that have not been done before would have been a lonely journey without this new tribe.  

We are all very supportive of each other. For instance when a chap I know, Ben Branson from Seedlip battled to get the first alcohol free spirit into the market, he was bullied by the traditional spirits industry.  He battled on with plenty of behind the scenes support from our tribe of pioneers. He’s now the first non-alcoholic spirit on Virgin Atlantic and many leading bars around the world.

You need a similar tribe to keep you going on the bad days.

How it feels on the days when Michael knows he has made the right decision?

I don’t always wake up knowing I’ve done the right thing because I understand that I can’t have it all.

Well, not yet I can’t.

I learned how to get good at building a business-to-business brand and got paid well for it. But what I am doing now is different. I’m now learning how to grow a business-to-consumer brand and it takes time. We’re in our fourth year.

But in general, I wake up feeling happier because I am surrounded by the right people. I have some lovely, old friends who live very safe lives. That’s fine. But it’s not for me. I crave creativity.

I needed to find my new, more adventurous tribe who do lovely interesting pioneering things.  They’re a whole different breed. We’re able to keep each other going and pick each other up when things are not going so well.  

I mostly feel excited by the potential of what I do. It could fail or fly. I’m excited because I don’t know what will happen but I’m invigorated by what could happen. I’m kind of enjoying the conclusion being out of my control. The balance of certainty and uncertainty.

And I am glad that I am not a talker. I am a do-er.

When our daughter Izobel came along, I found myself wondering what she would want for her Dad in the future.  A dad who was living a life of shoulds (and had all the trappings of “success”) or a Dad who was doing work that mattered?

When our daughter Izobel came along, I found myself wondering what she would want for her Dad in the future. A dad who was living a life of shoulds (and had all the trappings of “success”) or a Dad who was doing work that mattered?

Regrets?

Yes. Sometimes I would like more things.  For example, I’d love my little girl to have the big garden of our old house to run around in but we sold that and moved into our smaller city centre home.  

But timing is everything. What may be right now was not right then.

I am building. A new future. For me and my family.


Find out more about Michael, his writing and his business:

Angelfysh - Michael still takes on a small number of select brand and marketing projects.

Always Wear Read

His blog - 50odd

Instagram

Facebook

Some other career change stories that you might enjoy:

Lisa Smith - Art Therapist to Ginger Baker

You can’t start a business unless you just…start! Have a go and then evolve it in a way that feels natural for you. You don’t need to take giant leaps or risks.”

“I’m not stuck with a bad boss or a work situation that doesn’t suit me. I love holding the power of my future fairly and squarely in my own two hands.”

Lisa Smith Brill.jpg

Overview of earlier career.

Lisa followed her passion into an industrial design degree before travelling, doing a couple of ski-seasons and relocating to Hong Kong to teach both English and Design.  By the time she wanted to return to UK, she had become disheartened by the design industry and re-trained in Art Therapeutics before spending many great years working with children with learning difficulties in schools.  

While doing work that she loved, Lisa also met her husband who was in a similar field and they decided to relocate back to his stunning homeland, the Lake District. 

The trigger for change?

“The only real trigger for my change was a lack of enough therapeutic work to sustain me in the local area.

I’d always baked for friends and family and enjoyed it.  So, I began to bake cakes for a local café to supplement my income until I could build up enough work in Art Therapy. 

It was early 2000s and the British food scene was really exciting. Farmers’ markets were booming and there were endless opportunities for individuals to get involved and offer their products to new interested, excited customers.

After 18months of making cakes for the local café, I decided to take fate into my own hands and bake for myself.  

There was no big life change or any grand plan…it just gradually happened. There was no conscious decision about my future, I just knew that I would enjoy working for myself. 

So, I did.

I began my business in my kitchen, 13 years ago.”

First steps?

I baked an awful lot.  I trailed myself and my cakes around so many farmers’ markets and promoted the business everywhere.  People liked my products and bought more. Over time, I began to gain traction.  

I just loved the feeling of being creative.   I loved getting stuck in with my own hands.  I found it really rewarding doing it for myself, in my own way.  Just slowly and steadily growing the business.

In my family, I’m surrounded by individuals who own their own businesses, so I wasn’t that daunted by going it alone.  Even though it felt like business ownership was in my DNA, I still needed to learn lots along the way.”

What Lisa has learned? 

·         “I realised that creating something that gives others pleasure is important to me.  

This is one of my great drivers. There is emotion and comfort built into my cakes, more emotion than there ever could have been in any nuts and bolts creation from my design days.  

·         Have confidence in your products and yourself.   

In those early days, I worried too much about if I would be taken seriously.  I didn’t have enough confidence about being a business owner and felt intimidated.   I could have eased my pain by asking for help.  My confidence developed slowly, over time.  

·         Seek out help early.

There is so much help out there, but in the early days, I didn’t take advantage of it.  I was too caught up in worrying about what others were thinking or just feeling anxious that I was doing it all wrong.  

·         Try to get to grips with the business behind your business earlier than I did.

If I were to start again, I would approach it differently.  My approach was to start with the best product I could come up with and worry about the business behind it later.    I’ve since met other creatives who often come from corporate backgrounds who have imbedded a good business structure from the beginning.  I didn’t really grab the business by the horns in the early days.  

·         Do business your way, instinctively. 

There isn’t a wrong way to do business even if it seems like it when you start out.   

·         Be transparent about yourself and your business.  

I am known in the local area for being very open to having conversations and to helping others out.  For that reason, I have good relationships with journalists and other business owners.  That has meant that I have accidentally secured lots of different little bits of PR, here and there.  I enjoy helping others out. What goes around comes around.

·         You can’t start a business unless you just…start! 

Have a go and then evolve it in a way that feels natural for you. You don’t need to take giant leaps or risks.

·         Try not to give yourself such a hard time. 

I gave myself an awful hard time in the beginning thinking I was doing it all wrong but in fact I was doing everything just fine.  There are many ways of doing business.  You just have to find one that suits you.

·         Don’t waste time waiting for the perfect moment.  

Decide the right moment to start for yourself and just take it.  Then see what happens.  If it doesn’t work, you can tweak it for the better and then keep going.

·         Speak to as many people as you can to avoid re-inventing the wheel and to get some reassurance that you are on the right track.

This will help you tweak a business earlier rather than later when you have invested more.

 ·         Resilience.  If you are creating any personal business, you’ll need to have plenty of resilience and expect it to be tested regularly.  

You’ll need to build up your reserves so that you are strong enough to pick yourself up, dust yourself down and keep moving onwards.  My resilience reserves have certainly been tested in recent years.   The floods of 2015 wiped out my business premises AND wrecked my home.  But I started again.  I also spent last year undergoing cancer treatment.    

·         All good things start small

My little business began in my home kitchen but we have grown and developed over 13 years and now have a fantastic team of eight.”

How it feels on the days when Liz knows she has made the right decision?

“Gosh, it’s the best thing ever!

I love being in control! I feel empowered by my personal control.  This is my own creation.  I’m responsible for everything.  If it doesn’t work, there’s no one else to blame.   

I don’t have anyone else but me to point the finger at and that is very freeing.  I’m not stuck with a bad boss or a work situation that doesn’t suit me.  I love holding the power of my future fairly and squarely in my own two hands.”

Regrets?

None!

Find out more about Lisa and her Ginger Bakers

Website: www.gingerbakers.co.uk

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ginger_bakers

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GingerBakersKendal/


Some other career change stories you might enjoy:

Barney Whiter - Accountant to Financially Independent (The Escape Artist)

“I’ve met high flying partners in law / accounting firms who earn in excess of £750,000 pa who told me they couldn’t afford to quit their job. They had allowed their lifestyle to ramp up and it had become their prison camp.”

“I grew up with an unusually vivid fear of poverty.”

Interview with Barney Whiter - The Escape Artist

Interview with Barney Whiter - The Escape Artist

Overview of earlier career

After doing a degree in Economics, I qualified as a chartered accountant and then moved into the world of corporate finance - where I worked for 20 years.

The trigger for change?

Well, it’s a story that I can trace back to my childhood. I don’t claim to be normal…I grew up with an unusually vivid fear of poverty and of being homeless which was “hard-wired” into me via childhood experience.

When I was 11 (1981) my parents bought the biggest house they could afford and then interest rates rose to 17%. Imagine the devastation that would cause now!

My parents cut back sharply. Our holiday that year got cancelled. The newspaper was cancelled. Dad started brewing his own beer rather than buying it.

There weren’t many positives but, on some level, I gained an appreciation of how it’s possible to tighten your belt when you really put your mind to it.  

I think that period had an impact on almost every decision I made in the future. Deciding what to study at university. Where I lived. What career to pursue. These choices all revolved around trying to make sure that I would not end up poor and homeless. And yes, I realise how strange that may sound!

I got my first mortgage aged 26It was a normal 25-year term mortgage, but I wanted to clear it as soon as humanly possible.  By age 32/33 I’d developed the habit of saving and had paid off that mortgage.

Around that time, I’d taken a new job that wasn’t working out. The culture felt entirely wrong for me. Even though I had paid off the mortgage, I felt trapped as I still needed to earn a salary. My wife wasn’t working as our second child had just arrived.

I hated my job and felt like I was hanging on by my fingertips.


First steps to freedom?

To build up a “safety fund” in case I found myself unemployed, we slashed our outgoings from ~£3,000 per month to ~£1,000 per month…remember this was for a family of four.    

Eventually I found another job that felt less soul-destroying. But rather than getting comfortable and allowing our spending to inflate back up, I decided to continue to save hard.

After a number of discussions (and some arguments!) with my wife, I vowed to save and investing at least 50% of my income to give me the freedom and the choice that I craved.

Fast forward 10 years to 2013 (when I was 43) and I stumbled what I then thought was an obscure website about financial freedom in the US called Mr Money Moustache. This is a blog written by a software engineer who, by frugal living and sensible investing had “retired” at 31 and now did pretty much whatever he wanted.

What Barney learned? 

I learned that there was a whole Financial Independence movement which had started in the USA and was spreading internationally. This movement combines frugality, environmentalism, hard work and investing to get to financial freedom.

I learned about the 25x rule whereby you probably have enough to never need to work again if you can amass a portfolio worth >25x your annual spending. I realised that I probably had enough so I handed my notice in at work.


How can financial independence help with career change?

  • When it comes to career choice, I see two logical career strategies:

a) Do something hard that is well paid to allow you to save hard towards your financial freedom   OR

b) Do something you love

I did a) for long enough to fund a move to b). 

It’s possible to work a job you love that doesn’t pay much…but only if you have a freedom fund and / or a reasonably low-cost lifestyle.

  • If you want to change career you have to address lifestyle inflation.

I’ve met high flying partners in law / accounting firms who earn in excess of £750,000 pa who told me they couldn’t afford to quit their job. They had allowed their lifestyle to ramp up and it had become their prison camp.  

  • Financial independence is back-end loaded

It’s hard to save meaningful amounts in the beginning so many people never get started. But if you can get into good saving habits early on your money starts to work for you and amazing things become possible. £15,000 saved between 18-25 can turn into a pension pot of £1,000,000 over 40 years, thanks to the magic of compound interest.

  • You need to discuss your escape plan with your partner

To crush your spending, you need to have some very open discussions with your partner to get them on board.

They need to be on-side with your long-term life vision to be committed to the changes required.   It might not be what they originally signed up for.  They might have signed up to marry a stock-broker and all the trappings that sort of life brings with it.  Change is always possible but it can be hard.

  • You can have anything, but you can’t have everything.

It’s a bit silly to think you can have it all.  Life is about choices.

Lots of people fantasise about having financial freedom, doing work that they love or just dream of the day that they can stop doing a job they hate.  

The press often highlight the part of the story that involves retiring early but the live frugally with reduced consumerism for years part of the equation gets less prominence! 

  • Even when the cell door is open, some prisoners choose not to escape

The work that is required to attain financial freedom requires sacrifices and lifestyle compromises.  Not everyone is prepared to dig deep over a decent period of time to get the results they dream about.

Just because individuals could learn how to create financial freedom for themselves, doesn’t mean that they’re up for it. Remember how the movie Shawshank Redemption? One of the escapees couldn’t handle the freedom offered by the outside world, having become institutionalised.

  • Who the hell wants to retire at 40 and do nothing all day long?

Not me. I enjoyed having time off to “decompress” after my escape but eventually we all need to find something to do that provides meaning, purpose and challenge. I get this through writing, teaching and providing financial coaching for other people.

Financial freedom allows you to step away from the metaphorical “Prison Camp” that many of us have created for ourselves and decide what your future could look like.

How does it feel?

I feel grateful to wake up without an alarm and that I don’t have to get on a soulless, grey-suited commuter train.

I laugh a lot more than I used to. The fun and humour had been slowly squeezed out of my life in the corporate world.  Laughing is one of the most under-rated pleasures in life and I’m grateful that I can choose to do things that allow me to do it more often than in the past.

I have a lot of fun writing The Escape Artist blog and have enjoyed seeing the readership grow over the last 5 years from 1 view per day to 10,000 page views in a day. I hope it will continue to grow, but even if it doesn’t I’ll still have fun.

Find out more about Barney:

https://theescapeartist.me/

https://www.instagram.com/barneywhiter/?hl=en




Drew Boyd - Airforce to Marketing to Academic Career

“Never let a year go by without developing your professional career or personal career. There are so many individuals I have seen or met who have not lived by this life rule.  When they reach their mid-50s, they are dead-men walking because they haven’t stayed relevant.  They have stayed safe.”

“I’m 64 and technically retired but if I did retire, what would I do?  I look at my 89-year old mother who is still running a successful business and think…that will be me.”

Drew Boyd - Something tells me this chapter of his career is unlikely to be his last.

Drew Boyd - Something tells me this chapter of his career is unlikely to be his last.

Earlier career

Drew has had several diverse successful careers, initially working his way up to the rank of Captain in US Airforce in the nuclear missile division and later in strategic war planning but he knew long-term his career would be elsewhere. 

On leaving, he took up a position within United Airlines where he was the youngest sales manager leading a team who were all much older than him.  Ten years into this chapter of his career, after completing his MBA he was deciding whether to become a function or an industry specialist when he was head-hunted to join Johnson & Johnson in their…wait for it…gynaecology market development area.  Even though he had known nothing about that area of specialism, Drew flourished there for 17years becoming an expert in systematic creativity before retiring for a short time.

His trigger for change

Shortly after he left J&J, Drew received a call from the Dean of a small college in Chicago asking him to head up their new marketing faculty.  After one semester he received extremely positive reviews from his students and decided to begin the fourth chapter of his career as a full-time professor. Today he now spreads innovation across an entire university campus.

Drew’s first steps:

“The first step towards the current chapter of my career began with an openness some time ago to new opportunities. When I was asked to do some teaching after my MBA, I had a young family and said yes to some extra work on the side.  I continued moon-lighting and teaching on and off in one way or another throughout the rest of my career as I truly enjoyed the feeling of sharing ideas”  

What Drew learned about career change:

·         Lean into things that you are sure that you can’t do.

This is where growth happens.

 ·        Careers have to be driven with intention, but we also need to layer in some opportunistic meandering.

By that I mean that we need to say “yes” to doing jobs that others are not willing to do, to take some risks that others might not wish to and to put our hand up for roles that we are certain that we do not know how to do…yet. This adds that extra something to a career that leads to growth and relevance in both the short and the long term.

·         Never let a year go by without developing your professional career or personal career.

There are so many individuals I have seen or met who have not lived by this life rule.  When they reach their mid-50s, they are dead-men walking because they haven’t stayed relevant.  They have stayed safe. 

·         Managing your career means managing your relevance.

I made clear choices throughout my career to put my hand up early for projects, to get in on the ground level and to get out before their peak and before I got stuck. I see lots of people staying too long on projects where they might have done great work but they get stuck and this impacts their futures.

·          Work hard to be on the life-boat

If your business needed to be re-started tomorrow, would you be one of the chosen few that would be on the life-boat?  The only way that you get to be on the life-boat is if you have continually stayed relevant. 

Your functional expertise isn’t enough to keep you highly relevant or crucial.   If you stay stuck in Supply Chain or Finance or any other functional area, it’s simply not enough.  You have to constantly learn and that involves being outside of your comfort zone.  You have to be continually learning and evolving into that crucial member of the life-boat.   It’s a choice. 

·          Surround yourself with a small group of valued advisors – your own board of directors.

You need a confirmed inner circle throughout your career. These people offer you their valuable counsel and are interested in your valuable counsel in return. They can be colleagues, mentors, specialists, family members or neighbours but they have your back and offer valuable opinions.”

·         If career is important, never stop renewing yourself, learning and growing

Learning and growing is exactly how to move on from a transition period. For instance, I spent 5 weeks in Ottawa with one of the world’s foremost guitar makers, learning how to make a guitar.  I’ve now designed a creativity experiment around teaching students how to make their own acoustic guitars.”

How it feels on the days when Drew knows he has made the right decision?

“I feel just great!

No two days are the same. I get up, my feet hit the ground and I throw myself at whatever diverse challenges are in that day.

I’m 64 and technically retired but if I did retire, what would I do?  I look at my 89-year old mother who is still running a successful business and think…that will be me.”

Regrets?

“None at all!” 

 Find out more about Drew by checking out his new book – So, You want to be a Professor and his first book Inside the Box at:

www.drewboyd.com

Other career change stories you might enjoy:

 

Andrea Mara - Financial Services Career to Author

“Redundancy was the best thing that ever happened. I would never have been able to trial a writing career without the redundancy package and the support of my family. “

“Although I’m writing books full-time now, I’ve had times when I felt my funds were running low.  I would panic worrying that I didn’t have enough work.  Then, the very next day I’d wake up and start to panic because I had too much work!   But that’s the way of freelancing, I think. “

Andrea Mara 1.jpg

Overview of earlier career:

“I loved my job! I really liked the company and was very happy in my career.  I’d progressed through the normal promotional routes from junior positions, through to team leader and then into management over 17 years.

I enjoyed the work itself and over-time my work conditions had evolved into something that really worked for us as a family.  I felt lucky with my 4-day a week, one day from home and a precious permanent car spot.

Then the news landed that our Dublin branch was closing.  We were offered two choices: redundancy or re-deployment.  I was sad about losing my job but I was really sad about losing this wonderful work set-up which had taken such a long time to evolve and just worked really well.”

The trigger for change?

“The offer of redundancy was definitely my trigger for change.  My husband and I discussed it and agreed that it was the perfect opportunity to see if it was possible to make a living out of writing.   

The redundancy package would give us and me that window of opportunity.

When I’d pretty much made the decision to take the redundancy package, another opportunity came up within the business that threw a spanner in the works.  It caused a little wobble, mainly by my husband, who had been completely behind the idea of my career change experiment.  Perhaps the reality of our family’s income being chopped in half overnight had hit home.  Nevertheless, I realised that to accept a position I wasn’t passionate about at all felt like an all-head-no-heart decision.  Not the right thing at all. 

Other than that momentary blip, we both knew that this was a once in a lifetime opportunity to try to create a new career for me.”

First steps?

As it turned out Andrea took her first steps towards a writing career without knowing, 2 years before the redundancy package was offered. 

I’d discovered that I loved writing after I’d started a blog while I was on my third maternity leave.   I started it after feeling so frustrated by the disconnection between what my friends and I were discussing as working mothers and what I saw, heard and read in the media.   I had a desire get more real conversations going which sparked enough interest to set up a blog.

I started writing on all things working mother but ended up writing about anything that took my fancy.  I’d write in the evenings after work and after the kids were asleep. People would always ask me where I found the time or if it was exhausted but honestly it became the really enjoyable part of my day and didn’t drain me at all.”

The blog grew over those two years and Andrea began to get tapped on the shoulder to write articles for other people.  So, her first steps towards a full-time career in writing, even if she didn’t know that she might write as a future career option, began out of her desire to write about something she cared about in her free-time.

“I decided almost randomly to give myself a 6-months deadline to prove that I could make it work as a full-time career or I’d go back and get a job.  I put myself under-pressure to work it around school and pre-school and I also had our youngest child at home for the first 5 months. 

I’d work mostly in the evenings and in free moments during the day.  I probably made it more stressful that it needed to be but that’s how I work.  Knowing that I had a tight time-frame was important.  It gave me a clear focus.  I could have extended the original time-frame but it would have felt like failure.  

It was absolutely exhausting looking after the kids during the day and working at night.  I put myself under a great deal of pressure to secure ad hoc freelancing work and even managed also to secure a few regular gigs.  

The timing might have been a coincidence, but I also won an award for Best Parenting Blog by the Irish Blog Awards at the 6-month mark which I felt was symbolic.  It sort of cemented the idea that this was possible.

The 6-month experiment was a success.  I knew it was possible simply because I’d done it.  I broke out the bubbly and moved my big box of work dresses to the attic.

Towards the end of the 6-month trial, my youngest entered pre-school which then meant I had 2.5hrs every morning as well as the evenings to do more work without spending any extra on child-care. 

Keeping childcare costs at an absolute minimum was and is the key to my flexibility.   The compromise is that over school holidays I don’t get to do as much work as I might want to or attend as many events as I’d like to.  But these are compromises I’m more than happy to make to enjoy the privilege of doing work that I love.”

What Andrea learned?

·         If you can, do something you love.

Not everyone can love their work every day, whether it’s paid or unpaid.  You have to be in a particular place, at a particular time, to be able to take the risk that I took with my career change.  But the risk has paid off.

·         Redundancy was the best thing that ever happened.

I would never have been able to trial a writing career without the redundancy package and the support of my family.

·         A little risk is a good thing.

Taking a little risk is worth it if you could find work that might make you happy, that might allow you to feel engaged and to find opportunities to learn.  

 ·         You might not need to do something that you love.

Doing something that you enjoy or are good enough at that you can enjoy enough work-life balance that you don’t need to lie down when you get home from can be very fulfilling.

·         Unromantic practicalities matter.

It’s necessary to focus on the unromantic practicalities to be able to make an informed decision.  Like getting a real grip on your overheads.  Your savings.  Agreeing how much you are prepared to spend on experiments.  Without the redundancy money, we couldn’t have made it work but there are other ways that we might have made it work.  I was already doing some freelance work while working full-time and it didn’t drain me.  I could have continued down that path.

·         Nothing is perfect.

There are always sacrifices and compromises.  It can be challenging enough just keeping it together on some days.

·        Employ a career coach, if you can afford it.

I was so lucky to have a career coach included in my redundancy package and she was brilliant.  The good ones aren’t cheap.  If you’re at a cross-roads but using all your energy just keeping things moving – work, home and family, it’s hard to change the way you think about work.

You often need a different perspective to help you see work from a different angle and someone to help you think through the practicalities while you take the next steps.  My career coach prompted me with great questions and re-framed some of my thoughts from a completely different angle.  That helped greatly.  I can’t recommend getting a career coach enough, if you can.

·         It can be a bit of an emotional and financial rollercoaster ride. 

Although I’m writing books full-time now, I’ve had times when I felt my funds running low.  I would panic worrying that I didn’t have enough work.  Then, the very next day I’d wake up and start to panic because I had too much work!   But that’s the way of freelancing, I think.  You don’t have total control of your earnings.   

I still work a lot in the evenings but that’s my choice.  That’s the life of someone who is self-employed. I’m happy to give up my free hours in the evenings.  Happier than I’d ever be if I was back earning a regular salary.”

How it feels on the days when Andrea knows she has made the right decision?

“Amazing!  It’s amazing every day.  I’ve never had a moment of regret. It feels brilliant!  Of course, it’s not brilliant every minute of every day.  As I sit here talking to you, I’m sitting at my kitchen table, on a sunny day staring at the undone breakfast dishes.

Some weeks I’ve got no meetings because am just writing and that can feel a little lonely - in between school runs.  But I’m still doing something I love. 

I will never go back, unless I can’t pay the mortgage!”

Regrets?

“None!”

 

Find out more about Andrea: (Please add any social media links incase anyone wants to contact you/buy books etc.)

Website: OfficeMum.ie

Twitter: @Office_Mum

Instagram: @officemum

Facebook: Office Mum – Andrea Mara

Linkedin: Andrea Mara


 


Kelly-Ann Grimes - Hospitality IT COO to PA franchise owner

“I was in my mid-40s and I began to consider how many more years I wanted to or needed to work which led me to think through how I wanted to spend that remaining time.”

“It feels like a big weight has been lifted off my shoulders.  I’m in charge of my own destiny and it feels good. I’m enjoying not doing it for others but doing it for myself.”

Overview of earlier career.

Kelly-Ann spent 29 years in the hospitality industry working her way up from junior roles to an Operations Director role for a group of hotels and then COO for a technology business whose clients were in the hospitality industry.

The trigger for change?

“The main trigger occurred after 3 years in my last company, it merged with another business and my position was no longer required.

A few years ago, I’d toyed with the idea of starting my own business, but I had no idea what I wanted to do, and as I didn’t understand what it would take to do it, it felt too risky.  When I left my last company, I re-considered the idea.

I knew I was in my mid-40s and I began to consider how many more years I wanted to/needed to work which led me to think through how I wanted to spend that remaining time.   I knew that I was fed up working 60 hours a week for someone else.  We all work those hours when we are in our 20s and building our career but I had begun to feel like a commodity.  I made the decision - I wanted to work for myself.”

First steps?

“I began to think through what I was good at, what I loved to do and what I could actually do without intensive re-training. 

I discovered that I loved to organise, was great at planning projects and decided that I would really love to be a PA.  I began to do some research and came across a franchise opportunity that would fit really well called Pink Spaghetti.   It was a lightbulb moment.  

They offered head office, marketing and social media support while I would be responsible for finding my own clients.  After meeting with them and doing some more research to understand if my area was available I decided that if I didn’t do it then, that I may never do it.   It was too good of an opportunity to miss.”

What Kelly-Ann learned? 

·         “You need to trust your instincts and believe in yourself.

 ·         Even though everything felt right it certainly wasn’t easy. 

After so many years of working in teams with constant interaction I was surprised to find working alone difficult. That has been a hard adjustment, but I have set my goals to secure enough business to employ someone to work along-side me as soon as I can.

 ·         Networking has always terrified me

I’m not naturally good at talking to strangers.  But, I’ve found networking with other small business owners really good – there is none of that super-competitive corporate stuff going on

It is a very welcoming collaborative environment and even amongst people who do similar things to me, I’ve received offers of support that were so pleasantly unexpected.”

How it feels on the days when she knows she has made the right decision?

“It feels like a big weight has been lifted off my shoulders.  I’m in charge of my own destiny and it feels good. I’m enjoying not doing it for others but doing it for myself.

I feel happier at home with my children and husband and more relaxed with my friends.  The kids interact with me more than before (but they are teenagers of course!).  They said I’m not so short with them and grumpy.  Not that I was grumpy all the time of course!  

There are different stresses financially but I’m not as stressed as I was before.  

You get to an age where the financials are not as important as other things.”

Regrets?

“No – definitely not.  It feels like I am doing the right thing.”



Julian Abel - Various Careers to Food Entrepreneur

“We knew that if we didn’t try, we’d always regret it.”

“I might be doing something I love but I’m also working longer hours than I’ve ever worked.”

Julian Abel.jpg

Overview of earlier career:

“I undertook a 4-year apprenticeship in mechanical engineering with the MOD in the early 80’s and loved all the top secret, defence of the realm style projects and stayed for further year before deciding to study my first love at Manchester Polytechnic – Photographic Technology.  Basically, everything else to do with the photographic process other than the arty side. It was all applied and forensic photography, Holography and the chemical interactions between film and developer chemicals – it was fascinating.

Following my graduation in 1989 I became a camera repair technician, combining my love of photography and high precision engineering and after a couple of years became UK service manager for a luxury Japanese camera importer based in Reading.

Julian Abel Camera.JPG

Two years of long distance commuting from Lancashire to Reading, 90+ hour weeks and a growing interest in starting my own company meant that in 1993, I started my own professional photographic equipment repairs company based in Manchester and did that until I sold it in 2000.

I then had three years working for the company that bought me out, doing similar work. That was an unmitigated disaster. My wife and I had made a little money on the house we bought years ago, sold it, paid off the mortgage and bought and renovated houses for a while.”

The trigger for change:

“Both my wife and I have always loved food. Real food. Home-cooked. I’d been on various courses over the years learning to cook but I was certainly not a chef. We often discussed the generation of children of the 80s and 90s who’d never been taught to cook and were now parents. Parents who used pre-prepared food that was often really high in fat, salt and preservatives because there were no healthy and affordable alternatives.

We talked about some of the prepared sauces we saw on the market and just knew we could do it better. We had an itch to try to prove that pre-prepared food could be made with real ingredients that tasted great but without all the rubbish, the minimum of ingredients but with the maximum taste.

We knew that if we didn’t try, we’d always regret it. So, we took the plunge.“

Karen Walker 2 Nowt.JPG

First steps:

“After we’d decided on the brand name, we asked a corporate lawyer friend to have a look at it and she asked for opinions around her office. The resounding opinion was that Nowt Poncy was the freshest brand name that they’d seen in a decade and highly recommended we trademark it.

So we did.

We thought that we would trademark into two areas related to food but on the advice of our trademark attorney, ended up in eleven areas such as clothing, accommodation, insurance, telecommunications and a few more. Essentially, a high quality product without all the bull****.

We started small by creating just one product, our premium Tomato and Basil Sauce without all the nasties that other commercially-made sauces are made with, closely followed by our Curry Sauce that’s nothing like the curries you find in a UK curry house.  

Then we took it back to our roots at Manchester Metropolitan University, to their food science department to check whether they thought we were crazy or not. They didn’t. They were fantastically supportive and helped us get started by recommending a lab to help with shelf-life testing and other necessary food industry tests like nutritionals and of course labelling that was suitable for trading standards approval.

That kicked off an intense learning journey over that first year that blew our minds. Packaging, hygiene standards, labelling, bottling, testing, brands, trademarks, marketing, legals, distribution, retailing ……. the list goes on.

We knew nothing at that point but had to know everything to even enter the market.

We’ve since branched out into our other sauces and been stocked in major retailers. Additionally, we have a growing e-commerce presence and our sugar claims have recently been validated by the internationally recognised Sugarwise.org.”

What Julian learned:

·         “We can’t do everything well, but we had to do everything until we were big enough to get specialists to help us.

Everything is a steep learning curve but social media learning has been harder than other areas simply because is wasn’t something we grew up with. We are beginning to get some specialist help with that now which is a relief. 

Having to be knowledgeable on operations, marketing, sales and distribution at the same time is a stretch which is why Karen now deals with Ops, finance and customer services.

 ·         I might be doing something I love but I’m also working longer hours than I’ve ever worked.

We have a grand plan but at the moment we are in the depths of brand building.

We knew we had great products but we didn’t know anything else and the sheer size of the food business means we needed to learn so much. That takes time. You need plenty of energy, boundless enthusiasm and a thick skin to help keep negativity at bay.

You also need to be mentally fit. Our vision for the brand is much wider than just food but this is way beyond our skillsets at the moment and at some stage we will need someone to help us create the path forward.

·          Finding the right business support is key

Some days we feel like we are swimming in a sea full of sharks and we’re so far from the shore that we need to paddle much faster than we feel capable of.

That’s when finding people who can nudge you along your business journey becomes so important. People who are helping for the sake of helping, not just to line their own pockets.  We’ve come across both types but it soon becomes obvious which ones are ready to come on the long-haul journey with you.

·          Changing careers in your 50s can be really exhausting.

No one told us about the financial black hole of the food industry. There was so much to learn and we needed to learn it all if we wanted to be successful.

We sometimes joke we wish we had done this twenty years ago because it really is exhausting.

I know mid 50’s is no age but the physical and mental demands of starting and running a food company with all the margins, deals, logistics and physical manufacturing of the products as well as deliveries is a huge challenge every day.

·         You can’t do it half-heartedly

If you believe in the service or the product that you offer you have no other choice but to JUST DO IT

·          Small or large, being in business can be stressful. Sharing the downs as well as the ups is freeing and can give others reassurance.

I went to a business event recently with some really impressive CEOs in the food industry and was asked to speak for a few minutes about our brand and our journey.

I was so honest about some of my worries, my hopes and my fears that a few of these uber successes of the food world chatted to me privately at the end. They told me that they wake up worrying about exactly the same things as I do, just on a bigger scale. That was so reassuring as they seemed so confident and so successful.

The truth is, we’re all worried about where the next sales will come from.”   

How it feels on the days when Julian knows he has made the right decision?

Julian Abel 2.JPG

“We have definitely done the right thing!

Every day we are waking up to our new selves. We are loving creating and growing the Nowt Poncy brand one mouth at a time.

It’s fantastic when we watch people taste our products for the first time.  Their eyes sort of pop open with the ‘My God, it tastes homemade - it’s real food’ feeling.

We’ve become brand freaks. Obsessed by what other brands do well or badly. I will hang around in supermarket isles watching which brands people go for and asking them why they chose it. Price? Branding? Offers? It’s a fascinating subject.

Karen is forever saying “will you come on” as I pick up products and pull their labelling apart.”

Any regrets?

“None at all!  We would have had many more regrets if we hadn’t done it. If we were sitting in our dotage, we would have been having one of those recurring if-only conversations. There are huge highs and equally huge lows but we are moving forward, albeit slowly and carefully.

We face daily challenges and have to find ways around them but giving up is just not an option. Challenges are what being self-employed is all about and if it was easy, everyone would be doing it.”

Find out more about Julian, and his wife Karen’s, business The Nowt Poncy Food Company:

Website: www.nowtponcy.co.uk

Twitter:@nowtponcy

Instagram:@nowtponcy

Facebook:@nowtponcy

Linkedin: nowtponcy



Karen Walker - Head Teacher to Food Entrepreneur

“We just had the feeling that it was a now or never moment. That we’d regret in our old age if we didn’t do it. So, we did it.”

Karen Walker and Julian Abel

Overview of earlier career.

“I graduated from teacher training in 1988 and taught in mainstream schools for 10 years.   After that I joined the special educational needs sector and worked with children with learning difficulties and additional needs and felt like I was doing joyful work. 

I moved up through the ranks to Deputy Head Teacher and absolutely loved that job.  I enjoyed supporting the goals of the Headteacher.  It was a joy.

But all that changed.”   

The trigger for change?

“I was encouraged to apply for a Headteacher role in a special school.  I had no intention of going for it because I didn’t really want to be a Headteacher but I buckled under the pressure of other people’s faith in my abilities and agreed I’d go to the interview. 

Even preparing for the interview, which was a 2 day assessment process, was painful.  I did well and was offered the job.  That’s when the trouble started.

There were so many problems.  I couldn’t make the changes I wanted to and didn’t have the support I needed.  I tried in every way possible to make it work, to the extent that it made me ill.  I was working every waking moment.  With no down time.  Feeling very, very stressed.  In the end, I left the position, but it had taken a great toll on my health.

One of the saddest things is that I knew deep down that the role was not for me but having accepted it, I worked unbelievably hard to do my best to improve the school.

After I left, I went straight home and got into my bed and pretty much stayed there for 6 weeks.  Julian cared for me every minute.  I emerged slowly and continued to rebuild myself slowly. The recovery process was a long and hard one and took well over 18 months.” 

First steps?

“Christmas was approaching and since our household was living on one salary, we were economising.  We decided to spend some time making a really simple tomato and basil sauce, bottling it, wrapping a couple up in pretty gift wrap and hand-crafting little labels to give to friends and neighbours instead of presents.  

We gave one of these little packages to our local butcher. He tasted it and said if we could make more, he could sell them.   We did and then began to think more seriously about the idea of setting up a food company, selling similar simple, tasty, healthy natural sauces for people who are time poor but don’t want to eat pre-packed sauces with lots of nasties.

After long discussions, we just had the feeling that it was a now or never moment.  That we’d regret in our old age if we didn’t do it.  So, we did it.   We created our Now’t Poncy brand and began to figure out how to create a food company from scratch.”

What Karen has learned? 

·         “It’s a marathon not a sprint.  Julian said that to me recently and it’s true.  We’re trying to pace ourselves and our expectations.

·         You need to be prepared to live on a shoe-string given the investment required to start a food business.    Even though we had savings and I had a lump sum from my pension we still needed more money.  The company is a bit of a money pit.  It swallows up money like you have no idea!  2 years in we’ve stopped needing to put in lumps of cash from savings and using sales to purchase ingredients, but we are still experiencing the lean years where every penny was going towards our dream.

·         If you can get a part-time job while you are building the business up, do.  In the beginning Julian encouraged me to help out a friend in his business a couple of days a week, just to help me get back some of my old confidence.  I’m still working there which has been great for lots of reasons, not least to have a little regular cash coming in.

·         You need a huge amount of energy and drive to launch a food business.  We only recently reached the turning point, 2 years from starting.   Rather than going out there every day pushing the business, people are now starting to come to us.  We now feel really connected within the food industry but that has taken time and a great deal of effort – primarily from Julian – to put us on the map.

·         It takes time to build a business.   At the minute we are probably working 6 days and week and on day 7 we don’t work but we think, talk and plan for a few hours of that day.   It is definitely not a 9-5 job, but we love it.   We were brought up by strong parents who taught us to do what it takes and to work hard to achieve your goals.   We know that if we put in the time and effort, we will reap the rewards.

·         You need to know yourself.  I love supporting Julian.  He works so hard and it’s good to be able to take some of the responsibility from him. I love splitting the responsibility with someone rather than holding it all in my hands.   I am more comfortable in this situation.

·         You need to be willing to learn and ask for advice.  We’ve learned so much about everything from manufacturing, labelling, jarring, sales, marketing, accounts, etc., but social media has been one of the trickiest to learn.  We’re at a stage now where we need extra help.  We’ve begun to utilise the skills of younger associates, people who can help us market to the younger generation and who understand the way in which they interact with social media.

·         Having a fantastic partner beside me to work on this business and go on this life journey with has made it all so much more enjoyable.   We used to be ships that passed in the night – I’d either be working or sleeping.  Now, not only do we spend our free time together, we spend a great deal of our work time together too.  We never ever thought we’d be working together but we work incredibly well together.  We don’t have children so our focus is each other and the business.

·         Knowing what I’ve been through, I have to prioritise down time.   If not, my brain goes into shock and then I can’t work smartly and nothing gets done.   As long as I get some down-time regularly, I feel re-generated and raring to go.

How it feels on the days when Karen knows she has made the right decision?

“It feels incredible to be working on our business with Julian all day.  We have such a great partnership.  I couldn’t do this without him – I have so much appreciation for his talents, his driving force.  

We’ve just taken on a little office space which was offered to us by a friend a few weeks ago.   We have a marvellous start to the morning where we get up, have breakfast, do about an hour of work from home and then go to the office to kick start the rest of the day. Working outside the house, but still being together is fantastic.”

Regrets?

I shouldn’t have taken the Headteacher’s job.  I knew before I went to the interview that it wasn’t for me.  But everyone else had such faith in me.  I should have listened to my instincts.

My only regret about setting up Nowt Poncy is that we didn’t do it in our 30s.  Some days I really feel every one of my 56 years!  But I suppose if we had done it in our 30s we’d have more energy but we also wouldn’t have all the life experience of dealing with lots of different people and different situations.  That has helped us considerably.  

If you think about it like that it’s a positive.  We’ve got experience instead of energy – it probably all balances out!


Find out more about Karen and her husband’s, business The Nowt Poncy Food Company:

Website: www.nowtponcy.co.uk

Twitter:@nowtponcy

Instagram:@nowtponcy

Facebook:@nowtponcy

Linkedin: nowtponcy

Sally Smy - Retail Buying Manager to Personal Stylist

"It took a long time to build my own confidence as I felt too shy to say that I have ‘my own business’ when it was really just me, the kitchen table and not many clients!"

"Action results in confidence. It’s so easy to stay behind the computer but you need to get out there and try things in the real world."

sally smy 1.png

Overview of earlier career.

Over an 18 year career, Sally worked her way up to a management buying positions for major retailers including Debenhams, Arcadia Group and Tesco. 

The trigger for change?

“After my daughter arrived I found work pretty intense.  Over the last 10 years of my career, buying trips involved long visits to Hong Kong and India. I'd always previously enjoyed these but knew they would be difficult after my second child was born. Whilst on my second maternity leave, my request to work part-time was refused and I was offered a 9 day fortnight. 

I considered it but long haul travelling would have meant that sometimes I might have been away for multiple weekends in a row.  I didn’t feel I could commit to that schedule so I resigned.”

First steps?

“I had an inkling during my first maternity leave that I might set up my own personal styling business but as soon as I went back to work the idea faded.  In my second maternity leave knowing that I wouldn’t be able to go back full-time I really began to focus on it.  I filled many, many notebooks with those ideas in an attempt to think through options.

It took a long time to build my own confidence as I felt too shy to say that I have ‘my own business’ when it was really just me, the kitchen table and not many clients! 

It was hard giving up the security of that monthly pay cheque and it’s very tough doing everything, especially tech, yourself!  I got a real sense of achievement, however, from creating my own website and doing lots of activities that would have been done for me before when working for a large corporation.

There’ve been lots of ups and downs and experiments.  For instance, I trialled a partnership with someone who specialised in vintage clothing but realised pretty quickly that I really wanted to help people like me, professionals who needed a bit more confidence and they could get that from dressing well.  So, I had to have a difficult conversation with that partner.  Not a highlight for sure.

Then I started off working with women returning to work which I absolutely loved.  I understood their situation because I had had what I call my “beige moment” on maternity leave.

I caught sight of myself in the window of a shop, many, many months after the birth of my first child with no make-up, still wearing my scruffy maternity clothes and it was a real wake-up call.  I felt I needed to get myself back on track and feeling like 'me'.

When I shared this experience with friends, it really resonated with them.  I empathise with the situation of going back to work and not feeling confident in your own skin.  I understand these feelings because I've been there.  I’m not some scary fashionista and have definitely suffered from imposter syndrome in the past.  I didn’t feel trendy enough, thin enough or fashionable enough to be the stereotypical idea of a fashion buyer!

Now as a personal stylist, I simply want to help people have confidence in how they look.”

What Sally has learned?  Advice she might offer to others in a similar situation?

“Action results in confidence.  It’s so easy to stay behind the computer but you need to get out there and try things in the real world.   Networking for instance.  I’m getting better at it but I’m not a natural.  I have to keep reminding myself that people are not focussed on you when you are networking, they are focussed on themselves. It’s easier if you just ask a few questions and fill in the gaps.  You don’t actually have to say much if you don't want too.

Don’t underestimate the power of marketing and the need to learn as much as you can about marketing especially if you are doing everything yourself.

Know your worth and be brave with pricing.  I worked with friends for free in the beginning and got great feedback and satisfaction.  After that I priced myself extremely low (£30 per hour) which didn’t reflect the fact there is so much preparation and follow up work to my job - I calculated it at about £4 p/h in real terms!  I felt a great deal of angst about increasing my pricing but realised I had to in the end. I feel that my pricing now gives very good value for the help I am offering and my years of experience.

There is no perfect.  It’s a continuous journey where you are constantly learning.  We need to remember to enjoy the journey and the process not just aim for the goals.

You don’t need lots of clothes – you just need a collection of well chosen pieces and to know how to create outfits with them.”

What would Sally do differently if she had to do it all again?

“I would have probably attended a social media course earlier.  I was late to the party with it and still haven’t mastered it!”

How it feels on the days when she knows she has made the right decision?

“I absolutely love it!  It’s an amazing feeling when I help someone dress with confidence and look great.  I love seeing that change.  I love receiving positive emails from my clients! 

My family say that I am definitely less stressed and also…I dress better!   There’s no slumming it in the playground anymore.  I always have my face on and consider whatj consider what I'm wearing!

Also, I am dressing more for me now than ever before.  No head to toe black and no slaving to trends. I have less clothes than I used to but I can do more with them and as a result am far more creative with my outfits.”

Regrets?

“No – but 8 years on I’m still learning.  It’s all a learning process. I don’t get it right all the time – I have really busy periods and then really quiet periods.  There’s lots more I can do and learn but I'm thoroughly enjoying it!”

Find out more about Sally's Queen Bee Styling

M: 07956 293845

W: http://www.queenbeestyling.com/www.queenbeestyling.com

T: @Queenbeestyling

F: www.facebook.com/queenbeestyling

Lindsay Cornelissen - Corporate banking to wine entrepreneur

“I felt like I'd been in the industry so long that I was on repeat.”

“Someone asked me what my Plan B was, and I didn’t have one which seemed crazy! I needed to take control and create one. ”

“Every Monday night for 15 months I would traipse out of the office at 6.30pm armed with my tasting glasses. The first night of that course, I felt a little intimidated. But I learned to have more faith in myself.

Overview of earlier career.

Lindsay “fell into a graduate scheme in the City after university” not knowing exactly what she wanted to do but she was drawn towards a career in finance.  She moved companies a few times to widen her experience and “to keep moving up the ladder” and spent 18 years with her last employer with her final position as MD and Head of UK Corporate Clients.

The trigger for change?

Lindsay described her need for change as a “slow burn” rather than one trigger.  

She loved the client relationship side of her work and whilst she enjoyed managing teams, Lindsay realised that as her career had progressed she’d moved further away from the element that she “really loved doing” - looking after her customers and negotiating deals. 

“I had become restless as I’d been doing the same thing for a while and when the financial crisis happened, it forced me to take a step back and look at where my career was heading

I realised that I had progressed as far as I wanted to in banking.  I felt that I was moving further and further away from clients which was the part that I really loved.”

A late-evening conversation with colleagues in 2008 prompted some deeper thought on Lindsay’s longer-term career.  They were discussing the tv coverage of the Lehman’s crash where people were filmed leaving the Lehman’s office with their belongings in card-board boxes.

“Someone asked me what my Plan B was, and I didn’t have one which seemed crazy!

I needed to take control and create one.”

First steps?

“Over the years, my love of good wine had grown, and I was lucky enough to have tasted some lovely wines when entertaining my corporate clients - wines that I would rarely have had the opportunity to taste in other circumstances. 

We sometimes held wine tastings for clients where a wine expert would join us to talk about the wine.  It was at one of those talks that I had a lightbulb moment and thought ‘I want to do that!

I had always been interested in wine and my husband and I had done some basic evening courses in 1990s for fun.  I decided to take the next level of exam, the Wine & Spirit Education Trust's Diploma which is considered equivalent to a degree and a stepping stone to the Master of Wine qualification. 

So I went back to night school though I still didn’t have a "grand plan" and at that point I also didn’t even have much confidence that I could actually do it.

Every Monday night for 15 months I would traipse out of the office at 6.30pm armed with my tasting glasses. 

The first night of that course, with over 50% of the attendees being from the wine trade, I felt a little intimidated but I learned to have more faith in myself.   

We did a blind tasting and there was huge debate about one particular wine.  I had a really strong feeling that it was one particular grape, but others felt differently.  That night I learned to trust my judgement as I was correct even in the face of stiff competition from those who were more experienced.”   


What Lindsay learned?

In 2011, I’d completed my diploma and still wasn't sure how or if I was going to use it professionally.

But the banking industry, in dire need of stability, was faced with increasing legislation and regulation to say nothing about the general animosity towards that world.  

The thought of a completely different challenge became increasingly appealing and I began to ask myself if I was in the right place?

When another restructuring was announced at work 18 months later in 2013, I felt like I'd been in the industry so long that I was on repeat. It seemed to be the right time to take the opportunity to leave although I still had no clear plan. But that plan evolved over the next 12 months.

I researched the wine industry in general and thought long and hard about whether and how to set up my own wine business.

I re-engineered my CV and  applied for a couple of jobs in the industry but as I had no wine trade experience my expectations remained low.  I did however get selected for an interview to be the number 2 to a wine entrepreneur. 

Whilst I didn’t get that job, during the interview I was able to quiz the owner on how he had set up his business and took away some pointers to help me with my own business idea. 

Over those 12 months my thoughts and research developed. I went to wine trade fairs and met so many people in the industry who were helpful when they found out I was thinking of setting up a wine business – much more helpful that my old cut-throat world would have ever been.  

I spent so much time listening to other people’s stories in the industry that when I was ready to activate a business plan it was credible, well-researched and convincing enough to secure me a start-up grant.  

Whilst I am evolving the business all the time, I have stuck to that original business idea - a wine e-commerce business combining great wine and great customer service.”

 What Lindsay would do differently if she had to do it all again?

“I would have learned more about marketing the business on-line well before I launched the business (SEO, Social Media, Press, PR, Podcasts etc) though I'm not sure when I would have found the time to do it!

It would have been helpful in the early days especially when the website was being developed.  I’m learning it now as I go along but it takes time so I wish I had prioritised it earlier.”

 How it feels on the days when she knows she has made the right decision?

“Every day I know I made the right decision. I partly feel relief but mainly freedom.  Whilst I enjoyed working in my last organisation, I feel liberated from the bubble of that world, from the commute and from the structure. 

My former life was very City-focussed.  Now I spend every day learning something totally new. I am enjoying the freedom of a new world out there.

If I don’t want to work one morning I don’t have to.  It’s not in my personality type not to but I like having the freedom of choice.   

I enjoy meeting other entrepreneurs and small business owners too; they form a great support network.

I keep in touch with my old colleagues and meet for coffee or lunch occasionally.  Listening to them, I know the business cycle never truly changes and I feel some relief that I’m not still in that cycle.

That's not to say I don't miss the "large corporate world" altogether and I'm looking to fill that gap with NED positions where I can contribute some of the benefit of my experiences and have the best of both worlds."

 Any regrets?

“What's to regret? I work with wine!”

Learn more about Lindsay and her business:

Wines With Attitude saves busy wine lovers time by seeking out truly exceptional wines from around the world that do not disappoint. Lindsay loves helping consumers feel more confident in their wine choices through her blog posts (https://www.wineswithattitude.co.uk/blog) and through educational & fun wine-tastings for corporate events and private parties.

Email: hello@wineswithattitude.co.uk

Website: https://www.wineswithattitude.co.uk/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/wineswithattitude

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/wineswithattitude/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/wineattitudes

Linked In: https://www.linkedin.com/company/wines-with-attitude/

 

Joanne McGowan - Serial Entrepreneur to Charity Digital Development Manager

This big career change has given me confidence. If I can move from being a serial entrepreneur for 20 years into a brilliant corporate role so happily, it’s made me feel I can cope with anything.

I just feel…more relaxed. My stress levels have definitely evened out. When I was self-employed I always felt like I should have been doing something, working on the business in some way.

Overview of earlier career.

“Most of my career moves have felt like an accident or probably just being at the right place at the right time.  As I was about to graduate from my degree in Theatre Studies, an opportunity came up to run a dance and drama school where I had worked part-time.  I doubled the size of the business and loved it but after 9 years it was time to sell.

After my son George was born in 2006, I’d imagined that I’d enjoy having some time off but was back teaching part time when he was 6 weeks old. I loved being a Mum but I loved my work too. By the time he was 2 years old, I had an idea that I could run a children’s party business and gave it a go.  People liked it and it grew quickly.  This suited our lifestyle then as I would work mostly on the weekends when my husband was around to be with George.  Over time, I learned so much about getting a new idea off the ground and became pretty good at community group marketing.  The good old Mummy grapevine worked its magic and I grew that business over seven years without a penny of paid advertising – just word of mouth and social media marketing.  

I loved running the party business but saw an advertisement that caught my eye on twitter for a tutor to lead digital training for women returning to work or thinking of starting a business. This was the start of my social media marketing training work.   George was a little older and I didn’t want to sacrifice our precious family time at the weekends and this seemed a perfect way to start transitioning.

That experience opened up the chance to buy into a local business community franchise which allowed me to make amazing contacts who grew into friends but it didn’t turn out to be the business opportunity I thought it would be so we parted company.” 

The trigger for change?

After that experience, Joanne paused for a moment as she wasn’t quite sure what she actually wanted to do next. 

“I did some freelance work but then I thought – maybe I might like a proper job!?  I felt like I’d been there and done it as far as buying businesses and growing them and starting businesses from scratch for the last 20 years.  It didn’t feel like there would be enough of a challenge for me to do it again.  I fancied something different and I think I needed a bit more of a routine.  I was curious how it might be working in a team environment rather than doing everything myself.”

First steps?

“I was drawn to the charity sector as I’d done some freelancing work with a charity and it felt more rewarding than other work I’d done - it felt like I was making a difference.  Once I’d decided what I wanted to do, I went application-happy!   I soon realised that the whole job application process is so exhausting and I began to be much more selective.  That’s when things started to happen for me.

In the end I had four interviews for four jobs – I got down to the final two applicants for a role with a big corporate and whilst I was really disappointed that I wasn’t chosen, ultimately, I think it would have probably been too corporate for me at that time – probably a bit of a shock to the system after my early career.   I was nervous meeting the CEO of that business but we spent 2 hours together and think I held my own.  I was given very good feedback which boosted my confidence. I think that ultimately helped me get the job I have now. After a 2 hour interview I felt ready for anything!”

 What Joanne learned?

“The thing about being a working mum is that you re-invent yourself every few years. When George was small, I needed to do work that was flexible but he’s heading off to secondary school in September so the time felt right to try something different.

This big career change has given me confidence.  If I can move from being a serial entrepreneur for 20 years into a brilliant corporate role so happily, it’s made me feel I can cope with anything.  Having the confidence to just go for a career change is important. 

I knew I wasn’t alone.  I talked about my decision to look for a job rather than set up another business/freelance with lots of mum friends of a similar age who totally understood my motivations.

You need to be prepared for all the obvious but tough interview questions and have convincing responses.  For instance, I wasn’t sure if I was actually employable after 20 years of owning and running my own businesses and never having had a real job!  I knew I’d get asked why I wanted a job now so I was prepared with a good, but truthful, answer.  

The right job is out there.  When my friend, the photographer Kerry Harrison heard me talking about my new role, she described it as ‘a job that’s good for the soul’.  And it is. There are amazing people working here at the National Garden Scheme (ngs.org.uk) and an amazing group of volunteers.  We also work with nearly 4000 amazing gardens that have a common aim, to raise money for some fantastic nursing charities. My office is based only a few miles from my home on the beautiful Hatchlands estate, but if I need to work from home or flexibly on occasion I can, I just prefer to go into the office – it’s more fun."

How it feels on the days when she knows he has made the right decision?

"For pretty much 20 years I worked on weekends now I actually get that Friday feeling.  I love my job and I love my 2 days of freedom at the weekend to do whatever we want.  There’s no negotiating or cramming stuff in.  It feels amazing!

I can definitely switch off more.  When I come home, I don’t feel that anyone is expecting me to still be working.

It’s not just me - Jon [Joanne’s husband] says that he’s noticed that I switch off more easily than before.  I agree.  I just feel…more relaxed.  My stress levels have definitely evened out.   We all have stressful days and bad days at work but when I was self-employed I really struggled to get the balance right.  I always felt like I should have been doing something, working on the business in some way.  

This is my first proper job.  I’ve never had regular monthly pay and it’s bloody lovely!  But the work itself is also really great.  I thought that working in an organisation and not just for myself would mean that it would take longer to see results but in the 8 months I’ve been there I feel that I’ve made a difference.  I feel like I’m part of a team that is making a huge impact and we have big plans for the future.  I feel like I’m contributing to something very exciting."

 Regrets?

“None, none at all.  I’ve never had any regrets.  I’ve done so many things and gained so many transferrable skills and I now have a job I absolutely love with a good work-life balance to boot."

 Find out more about Joanne:

Twitter @guildfordjo,

Instagram @guildfordjo

Linked In - https://www.linkedin.com/in/joannemcgowansurrey/

Rob Young - Army Career to Business Career

"I had a strong feeling that if I left at 50 or 55 that I would then be unemployable as I’d appear institutionalised and perhaps even weary.”
"If you are anywhere near 50, you really need to put your back into finding a new job or a new career.  It’s definitely not easy.  You need to attack the situation like you’re climbing a mountain." 

Overview of earlier career.

Left school at 18.  Spent 24 years in the Army as both a solider and an officer.  Resigned his commission at 45.

Trigger for change:

There appeared to be two clear triggers for Rob’s desire for change:

“I felt that I’d had the best from the Army and wanted to give civvy street a crack.  As my daughter was also starting university there was an opportunity for my wife and I to settle down in one country after having been moved all over the world for so many years. 

Also, whilst I had lots of confidence that I could actually do anything with my experience, I also had a strong feeling that if I left at 50 or 55 – which was the traditional break-points from the army – that I would then be unemployable as I’d appear institutionalised and perhaps even weary.”

First steps?

“I didn’t know what kind of work I actually wanted to do but I certainly knew what I didn’t want to do i.e. anything to do with the military, defence sectors or logistics which had been my arena.

I felt so optimistic, like I could do almost anything - unless of course it was highly technical or required specific qualifications.   I had a sense that I was likely to end up in a big corporate in some sort of management role.”

Rob decided to access all the support groups which were available to him as an ex-soldier and officer to help him get settled in civilian life.  One of those was The Officers Association which advertised (for a nominal fee) jobs for companies who were interested in attracting ex-army personnel. 

“I accepted the first job offer I received and worked for a very small company in a logistics position which I hadn’t really wanted but my wife/mentor/coach gave me some great advice that ‘it’d be much easier to find a great job from a position of having a job’.  She was, of course, right.’

A year later, having done some good work and recruited his replacement, Rob moved on to bigger things and kept moving onwards and upwards in a variety of positions.   In different industries, in different roles, in companies with different problems until he found his niche in leadership roles within transforming businesses.   Over the next decade Rob had a whole range of “fantastic”, “interesting”, “challenging” , “angst-filled” and “fun” career moves.  At its height – he had a spell of travelling around Europe with a European billionaire in his private jet acquiring businesses and at its lowest point doing some seasonal work over Christmas at M&S – "and every type of experience in between!" 

What Rob learned?

 Networking is important.”  Rob didn’t expressly recommend networking until I prompted him but our conversation was peppered with references to friends gained through business, connections made through playing sport and connections through old careers and previous jobs.  Networking appears to be something Rob does very naturally.

"Everyone I know who was in the army for a long-time and left accepted the first job they were offered – I think we all knew how important it was to get started.

Be wary of who to take advice from.  Taking advice from too many different perspectives just leaves you confused. Don’t ask friends what they think of your CV. Find experienced hiring managers who know what good looks like and experienced CV designers.  It’s the hardest thing in the world to put together on the easiest subject in the world – you.  At one point, I totally and utterly wasted £5000 employing a company to slightly enhance my CV and tell me some average advice that we all know – get out there and network.  They did it over some very nice lunches in nice restaurants but that was a total waste of cash and time.  

Know thyself.  Self-awareness is a key factor in career change.   For instance, I was fired once from a job and was so surprised that I hadn’t seen it coming.  I took from that that I needed to brush up on my self-awareness.  How you see yourself and how you view your world have an impact on the work you do and the work you could do.

If you are anywhere near 50, you really need to put your back into finding a new job or a new career.  It’s definitely not easy.  You need to attack the situation like you’re climbing a mountain.

Don’t dumb down even if you are desperate.  At one low point, I just couldn’t get a job but really needed a job to pay the mortgage.  I dumbed down my CV, not really lying but certainly not telling the full truth about my previous leadership positions.  I secured a seasonal job at M&S which helped me pay the mortgage.   But, ultimately, I could see nothing but opportunities to improve their operations and logistics and it was difficult not to tell someone.   I knew my expertise would help the business but they didn’t want to know.  I would never have fit in the long-term and would have been seen as a trouble-maker.  The last thing companies need is some over-qualified smart ass when all they actually wanted was someone to do the job the way they wanted it done.  But that was never going to be me.

There are good people in the world who just need a break and it pays to use your talents to help them.  If I have a client who’s in a bit of a fix and can’t pay me my fee for helping them re-design their CV and linkedin profile and coaching them on interviews, I just ask them to pay when they get a role and only if they agree it’s been helpful.  I enjoy helping them because I’ve been there and would have appreciated someone doing the same for me back then.  And have never once not been paid.  Win win."

What Rob would do differently if he had to do it all again?                   

“I wouldn’t have touched the 3rd sector (Not-for-profit organisations including charities).  I wouldn’t ever recommend becoming a trustee of a charity unless there is a deep, deep connection with their goals.   I would have saved myself a great deal of angst.”   Enough said.

How it feels on the days when he knows he has made the right decision?

“Even though I don’t need to work, I love to work.  I love the buzz of winning new business.  I love the thrill of finding the right person for one of my clients.  I love convincing my clients to choose beyond the right person for one job but to choose the person who can help the company grow in the future.   I love choosing to work with a small number of clients who work mostly exclusively with me.  

I do know myself and I know that I love being in charge.  The leadership bit throughout my career has been the most enjoyable parts but I know it’s not for everyone.   It was a real privilege to command in the Army and it has also been a real privilege to lead in the civilian sector.   People rely on you to do what’s right and in most cases they enjoy having someone decisive in charge.   Very few things get done well in a committee.  I always like a committee with an odd number…and the best odd number for me is 1!  I’ve always enjoyed the pain-pleasure experience where the buck stops with me.”

Any regrets?

"Sure there are regrets about investments around the financial crisis that listening to my wife/mentor/coach Mrs Young might have avoided.   But apart from the charity sector experience (see above), I have spent my life looking forward not back – that’s where the opportunity and danger lie."

If you'd like to learn more about Rob and his current business...


Email:  rob@armstrongdenby.com

Web:  www.armstrongdenby.com 

Linkedin:   https://www.linkedin.com/in/justrobyoung/ 

Twitter: @justrobyoung     

 

Jennifer Corcoran - Executive Assistant & PA to Social Media Trainer

"Honestly, the thing that kept me there for so long was the annual bonus.  There was always something I was saving up for – the new kitchen, the holiday etc.  Years would go by and I was still there, sticking around for the bonuses." 

"It feels good to be of value and to be appreciated for helping others to do something they couldn’t do without me."

Jennifer Corcoran 1.png

Overview of earlier career.

Studied English and French at university.  Jennifer had no clue what she wanted to do for a career but knew with certainty that she didn’t want to be a teacher or journalist.  She fell into a short-term administrative role for a technology magazine in Dublin (Jennifer’s home town) and loved it.  She then relocated to London and found it hard to break into magazines so ended up in other industries doing Executive & PA work for 15 years. Worked for a financial services business the last 11 years.   

The trigger for change?

“How the hell I fell into working in a financial services business (a shipping finance business), I don’t know!  I felt like the fraud in the team because everyone loved the products but I found them dull.  Honestly, the thing that kept me there for so long was the annual bonus.  There was always something I was saving up for – the new kitchen, the holiday etc.  Years would go by and I was still there, sticking around for the bonuses. 

The wake-up call came for me when I slipped a disc.  Pain management included 4 epidurals over 2 years and 60-70 physio appointments in an attempt to avoid surgery.  A couple of years ago, just a few days before Christmas I woke up one morning and just couldn’t stand up.  I was in agony and decided enough was enough.  I begged for surgery and my request was approved for early January.   Even on the day of my surgery I was receiving work emails on my blackberry.  Not one of them said ‘good luck with the surgery’ and certainly no-one from my immediate team sent me flowers after more than a decade of working there.   I realised there and then that I had had enough of this culture of profit over people.  I had a degree like all of my team members however I didn’t feel respected for the work I’d done to keep everyone’s seemingly more important work moving. 

Towards the end, just to prove a point and my own worth, I applied for and won awards for my work such as Most Networked PA in London” and a Pitman Training’s “Super achiever” global award.        

After the surgery I couldn’t work for 6 months and had to lie flat on my back for 2 long months which gave me lots of time to think.  I’d gone through a divorce a few years earlier and I’m sure the stress had also impacted on my back.  I’d had a great boss who really valued my work for about 7 years before one of my peers was promoted.  That new boss didn’t appear to value or respect my work or experience and it felt like I had had been given a demotion of sorts.

It all culminated with me deciding to resign because frankly, life is too short.”

First steps?

“I had a staged re-entry into the workplace and then resigned and began to work out what to do.

I set up my own business to train entrepreneurs to do their own social media marketing. I’m using the combination of all the skills I’ve learned in my life – from my English degree, to my networking skills to my love of training people.  I am using a life-time of skills.”

What Jennifer has learned?  Advice she might offer to others in a similar situation?

“Just because you are good at something doesn’t mean it is you.  

I asked myself the question - If I die tomorrow would I die happy? No, not while I was in my old role.  If you asked me that question today I would say yes because I would die feeling truer to myself, feeling valued and definitely feeling respected.

Sure, I’m earning less than I was in my old career but I work autonomously and do things that I love for the majority of the time.

You need to work out why you are not happy in your role and then write a list of pros and cons.  I was going to leave before the credit crunch hit and then I felt that I couldn’t.  There are always reasons not to leave.  You need to listen to your gut and even if you can’t afford to leave at that moment, you can always sow some seeds.  Otherwise before long 1 year will turn into 11years and then 20 years before you know it.

You’ll always have your friends and family but they might not understand your journey or what you actually need to feel valued and respected at work.  Lots of my friends and family thought I was sorted and should never leave mostly because of the bonuses and their impressions of the industry.  You need to make the right decision for yourself rather than letting other people influence you or one day you might wake up and say ‘how did this happen?’ It is so easy to get carried away by other peoples’ expectations.

Knowing yourself is important. I’m an introvert so whilst I can run big events and workshops I need to give myself time to re-charge alone and as an introvert I train most people on a one-to-one basis which I totally love.

When it comes to my mindset and setbacks I try to talk to myself as kindly as a good friend would.  Also, a good friend can be objective and help you figure out different paths so that you can make your own choices.  

It is important when you are doing things for the first time or changing your world that you surround yourselves with others who are doing the same.  I’ve found a new group of local entrepreneurs who started their businesses around the same time as I began mine and we meet a few times a year over coffee or wine and support each other though good and bad weeks.”

What would Jennifer do differently if she had to do it all again?

“I wouldn’t change quitting for sure.

Perhaps I was a bit naïve when I started my social media training and consulting business.  I did the website and thought interested people would just start to trickle in!   But I realised fairly quickly that I still needed to do the face-to-face networking.  At the time, I didn’t realise the importance of things like email marketing.  I also naively thought that my friends and family would be very supportive and would recommend me everywhere but that hasn’t happened.  I’m still not sure why.  My customers are coming from my own efforts or from difference sources.  That was a big learn.”

How it feels on the days when she knows she has made the right decision?

“It feels good to be of value and to be appreciated for helping others to do something they couldn’t do without me.  By training the individuals behind companies to do their own social media marketing I feel like I am increasing their confidence.   I can relate to my clients who don’t know where to start with social media because I was once exactly where they are but have learned lots of tips and strategies that can make a difference to them and their businesses.  It is exciting for me to do that.”

 

Regrets?

“Perhaps not leaving earlier?

But if I had left earlier I wouldn’t be doing what I am now – I might have been doing a similar job in a different company and I might have liked that more than where I was but it wouldn’t feel like doing this does.  I have found my sweet spot.”

Jennifer Corcoran is the CEO and Founder of My Super Connector which is a social media consultancy.  Jennifer helps professionals and entrepreneurs to share their stories online.  She does this by polishing up their profiles and teaching them how to connect with finesse. Check her out here: 

Website: https://mysuperconnector.co.uk
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jennifercorcoran1/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/SuperConnector
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/mysuperconnector/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mysuperconnector
Pinterest: https://uk.pinterest.com/superconnector/

 

Sam Caporn - Corporate Wine Trade to own consultancy - The Mistress of Wine

"I wanted to take control of the situation and asked if I could work part-time. I was offered a four-day week but was told that I’d have to ‘keep my phone on’ on Friday which would never have worked as it didn’t really change anything. After talking it through with my husband, I decided to resign to focus on exactly what I needed to focus on. That decision changed everything."

"Then since my son went to school, I’ve been able to grow the business much faster by picking up more work and building my profile. I presented on BBC1’s Saturday Kitchen for a year or so as one of their wine experts."

Sam Caphorn Photo 1.jpg

Overview of earlier career.

Most of career spent in the wine trade working for big companies.  Long haul travel at least once a month to countries like Australia, South Africa and California.

The trigger for change?

“There were two real triggers which prompted my change. The first was that I was struggling to get pregnant.  The second was that even though I had passed my Master of Wine exams first time (less that 1% pass exams first time) I was completely stuck on my dissertation and still hadn’t passed it after five years.   I wanted to take control of the situation and asked if I could work part-time.  I was offered a four-day week but was told that I’d have to ‘keep my phone on’ on Friday which would never have worked as it didn’t really change anything.  After talking it through with my husband, I decided to resign to focus on exactly what I needed to focus on. That decision changed everything. 

I resigned in Jan 2011, was pregnant a couple of months later by March and passed my dissertation that same year, in September, to become one of only 370 people worldwide to have gained the title Master of Wine.  I loved being a mum and didn’t want to go back to a full-time job.  After resigning and therefore having no job to go back to anyway, it definitely freed up space for me to think creatively about my future.  It was pretty common to go freelance in the wine industry, so I thought I’d give it a go.”

First steps?

“Knowing that brand was so important in the wine industry, I met with a design consultant and sorted name, brand and website out but a silly mistake (the name selected was widely already used) meant that a speedy re-brand was required.  Over time, I slowly did little bits and pieces of work to keep my hand in while my son was very young – the odd bit of wine judging or running tasting sessions and events. 

Then since my son went to school, I’ve been able to grow the business much faster by picking up more work and building my profile.  I presented on BBC1’s Saturday Kitchen for a year or so as one of their wine experts and now work with Aldi as their Wine Expert which is a new and exciting assignment for me.  

Some people have loved my wine flavour tree infographic and this has given me a nice USP to use at corporate dinners, events and the like.

I’ve started to do more travel again, but I largely work around my son.”

What Sam has learned?  Advice she might offer to others in a similar situation?

“It’s been really important for me to connect with people who do what I do.  For instance, my first client came from a recommendation from another Master of Wine who was too busy to take on a particular assignment.   

Connecting with others who do what you do and understand what you do allows you to price yourself correctly.  I started off offering my services at a very reasonable price to ensure I was competitive and as you get more work and grow in confidence you can slowly increase annual rates. 

There will always be people doing the same things as you do.  You need to find the gap and fill it with your own personal style.  It helps to know your competitors so that you understand the market gap.   It’s also really interesting to understand related industries – for me technology and food are very interesting industries and I watch how they change and try to figure out the impact on my industry.

Talk to customers, listen to relevant podcasts, communicate with potential customers, clients and people all around your industry.

You’ve got to know where your interests and talents lie.  For instance, lots of freelance people write blogs but I have little interest in blogging.  I have lots of interest in wine and the business of wine so I’d prefer to be teaching all sorts of people about wine.

By understanding what you are good at and why you are good at it, keeps you very interested in what you’re doing which I think shows to the outside world.

Have faith.  If you love what you are doing and are working hard at getting your message out there, the right people will find you…not necessarily the people you want to find you but the right people. But that does take time.

As you get older, satisfaction and balance become more important that they were before.

I took it at my pace which may not be right for everyone.  It would be hard to hit the ground running. In that case, it would be important to figure out what your USP is as quickly as possible.

You have to be real. You have to be genuine as if your brand is built on you, you have to represent and reflect the real you at all times.”

What Sam would do differently if she had to do it all again?

“I wouldn’t do much differently…I perhaps wasted time re-branding and I definitely wasn’t quite clear enough on what I wanted.

If I had to hit the ground running, I would have planned more, had a clearer strategy and understood my USP earlier but I allowed myself that time to evolve while loving being a mum.   To start faster than I did, you’d need to be very clear on your goals.  After that, networking opportunities become clear and you’d need to be very visible to get clients earlier than I did.  I did all that in a 5-year time span working part-time but I think it could be done in 2 years working full-time”

How it feels on the days when she knows she has made the right decision?

“Satisfying, really satisfying…and free.  I work hard but if the sun is shining, I have a lovely glass of wine and sit in the garden!”

 

Find out more about Sam and her WINE CONSULTANCY:

Sam Caporn -  The Mistress of Wine

 

 

Ges Ray - Lifetime Banker to Public Speaking Guru

"I am retirement age but the sky is my limit.

Every day when I wake up (although it’s hard to rid yourself entirely of the 40 years of tough Mondays) and feel like I will never be done learning."

Ges Ray - 2.jpg

Overview of earlier career.

“The first 25 years were the epitome of stability; a traditional route from Junior (read making the tea) to Manager with Natwest Bank.  When banking changed radically around the late 1990s, we all had a choice; stay in the bank for heart attacks and early deaths or leave on less than favourable terms – most of us signed the papers before they hit the table!” 

10 years of Business Development/Relationship management roles within a range of SME businesses followed where “instability became the norm”.  The rollercoaster experience of 3 redundancies with minimal or zero redundancy packages with an uncomfortable spell of being on benefits is not one Ges would wish on anybody.

The trigger for change?

There appeared to be three defining triggers for Ges’ change:

“I had secured a career advisor (Peter Wilford) to help me re-shape my career, re-design my CV etc and I sent out hundreds of job applications but of course because I was in my 50s by then, I heard nothing back.  When my career advisor put me through a Myers Briggs test, it was a clarifying moment.  I discovered that I didn’t want to or maybe couldn’t ever work for another boss again.”

“My wife and I found ourselves living in an empty nest after both our daughters had left for university and Lidl opened near my home in Dorking!   Our household bills went through the floor.  These two factors were absolutely key in giving me the confidence to take a risk and give my own business a go. As an ex bank Manager my natural inclination is to be risk averse, but this encouraged me to have a go at starting my own business, even if it meant that we might end up having to eat baked beans for a while and live off my wife’s part-time salary. She supported me so that I could try something new.”

First steps?

“I realised that I had actually had a secondary career in public speaking bubbling beneath the surface throughout my working life. In the late ‘70’s I was ‘encouraged’ into Public Speaking competitions, the training for which meant I would be the one to volunteer to give speeches on Bank training courses, and volunteer to MC at events and to lead workshops both in the bank and when employed in SME’s.  In my private life, I’ve been radio broadcasting, MC’ing events at the Leith Hill Music Festival for many years and was a Sunday school teacher for 30 years – if you can control a bunch of 8 year olds, a room full of adults is a cinch!  Even in my early 20’s I was a British Junior Chamber of Commerce Regional public speaking finalist.  What I didn’t realise was that when I volunteered to do these things, the others in the room visibly sighed with relief.  I was able to do something that others found really difficult.

When I figured out that public speaking could be my ‘something new’, I took the advice of my career advisor and began networking everywhere.

After attending a great deal of networking breakfasts, I’d gained a stone and a half in weight but had also fully formed the idea of what I wanted to do.  Then with the help of that newly-created network I began to be approached for all sorts of public speaking assignments, from keynote speaking at business events to delivering workshops and 1-2-1 sessions to build people’s confidence in public speaking.

It was this series of serendipitous happenchances – strange how these things occur when you are open minded enough to go looking for them – that enabled me to combine the threads of four decades of commercial roles together with a lifetime of experience in public speaking that had been running in parallel, and venture into the world with my new idea”

What Ges learned?

“All the skills I’d learned in my career combined with all the snippets of life experience that I didn’t view as important at the time combined to create something new. 

Nothing in life is wasted if you grab it and make use of it.

Simply being yourself, rather than the person that you feel you ought to be because of your role or title, is important. People buy people. By being yourself, you are the authentic you, and all the more memorable for that.”

What Ges would do differently if he had to do it all again?        

“Probably nothing.  There’s no real value in what-ifs.  What if I had stayed with the bank?  I might have been dead by now with the stress.  What if I hadn’t been made redundant in the smaller businesses?  I wouldn’t have had to put so much effort into doing something new and I wouldn’t be where I am today.   No.  Nothing.”

How it feels on the days when he knows he has made the right decision?

“Absolutely liberating!  I am retirement age but the sky is my limit.

Every day when I wake up (although it’s hard to rid yourself entirely of the 40 years of tough Mondays) and feel like I will never be done learning.   I try to take advantage of everything I can learn e.g. being a founder Institute of Directors Advance member to take advantage of several evening workshops a month delivered by other experts on their field. There’s always something new.

I feel respected for what I contribute and what I deliver, not my grade, not my job title or my years of service. Also, the reward of building someone’s confidence in public speaking and watching them spread their wings and fly is beyond any salary package.

Opportunities are out there – in fact the opportunities are endless if you are open to them.  For example. I’m collaborating with an overseas university spin-out on a virtual reality public speaking training project, which is really exciting. I’m also being coached in the authoring of a book on public speaking; that’s really really exciting!"

Any regrets?

“I have a couple of financial regrets – I wish I had not been such a loyal, naïve and faithful shareholder in the bank, for example.  I should have had a six-figure retirement fund but I ended up with zero. With 20/20 hindsight, I wish I’d invested my first redundancy package in a few buy-to-let flats but I needed the money at the time to look after my family and anyway, the term “buy-to-let” wasn’t really talked about back then!”

If you’d like to learn more about Ges and his public speaking business…


Email:                    ges.ray@speakinginpublic.info

Web:                    www.speakinginpublic.info

Linkedin:             http://www.linkedin.com/in/gesray

Facebook:           www.facebook.com/SpeakingInPublic

Twitter:               https://twitter.com/gesspeaking  


 

Charlotte Moore - Social Media Editor to Fab Foodie PR Specialist

“Find a way to take a leap into your dream – volunteer, start a side-hustle, work on your idea at the weekend, test and tweak it with the audience you're after to see if they have an appetite to pay for your goods or services. We all know that nothing in life is guaranteed but that having said that, you are guaranteed to have regrets if you don’t give it a go in some way.”

Career overview

10 years as a copywriter across many sectors. Founding member of Tesco’s social media team in 2011 and helped to create some amazing social media campaigns.

What triggered your career change/career re-design?

For a long time, Charlotte loved her role at Tesco. “It was wonderful to grow a huge brand across lots of different social channels, with the added perks of huge budgets to work with and hanging out at Facebook and Twitter headquarters.”  But three years in, the glossy sheen had worn off as social media marketing budgets were outsourced to agencies, reducing the in-house team to little more than content editing – “I felt creatively stifled as I no longer had a real say in campaign development.”

As her interest in work at Tesco was declining, Charlotte started up her own food blog and spent lots of time visiting food shows and fairs at weekends “talking to anyone who moved” says the self-confessed Northern chatterbox. “I spent a great deal of time talking to small food business owners and realised that these start-up entrepreneurs had the least amount of time and money, but needed the most amount of help with growing their brands.

”I realised that I had never had a genuine love for the Tesco brand, but I LOVED these tiny food entrepreneurs.”  In April 2015, there was an announced round of redundancies at Tesco and Charlotte had fingers and toes crossed that she would be on the at risk list as she knew that it was “time to explore something new.”

First Steps?

Sadly, Charlotte wasn’t offered a package as her job still existed in the restructure, but as her heart had already left Tesco, she resigned and began her own business – copywriting for food start-ups - and used her final 3 months’ notice period salary to fund it.

“It took a year of hard graft on very sporadic funds for me to realise that most of the small food business owners that I spoke to didn’t actually know what a copywriter was or did.  It was no wonder that I was always struggling to get a regular stream of clients. Yet at the same time, I was doing bits of PR for myself and friends as a favour, but wasn’t actually telling anyone about this – yet everyone knows what PR is!”

“With a very heavy heart, my bank statements clearly told me to head back to the corporate world where regular pay cheques would help me pay the bills. Thankfully, it was then that I had a lightbulb moment about my business which changed everything.”

Charlotte realised that putting affordable PR at the forefront of her brand was going to be the way forward. She re-named her company Smoothie PR, re-branded the business and got her lovely partner to create a brand new website and logo.

“PR was not my background, but I figured out a way to do it differently to the usual traditional and very expensive model. Most agencies charge anything from £1.5k-£4k per month and write a lot of generic press releases on your behalf.  I designed Smoothie PR to use a model that allows small business owners to do their own PR in a 10 minutes a day for only £49 per month, without writing a single, boring press release.”

What did you learn during that process?

“I have never laughed or cried so much in a year. Without trying to sound like an X Factor contestant, the highs are the greatest you’ll ever know and the lows make you wonder why on earth you’re doing this!”

“I couldn’t have done it without the fabulous support I’ve had from my boyfriend, my parents and my wider family and friendship networks. Support from an emotional perspective, comfort when needed and encouragement to keep going have all helped me to get to where I am today.”

If you had to do it all again, what would you do differently?  

“If I’d done more thorough research about starting my own business then I probably wouldn’t have done it, as it can look daunting on paper.  But, I was so unhappy at Tesco that I just had to give something different a try, so kind of made things up as I went along to see what worked for me.”

“I would have taken the need for regular cash flow more seriously in my first business. I was stubborn when it came to freelancing at agencies that stand for everything I don't. The second time around, I was so motivated by NOT going back to work for an agency or another corporate that I concentrated much more on creating a stable business model that would bring in a steady income.”

On the days that you KNOW you have made the right decision, how do you feel?

“I can’t believe I get to do this as a job – in fact, it doesn’t feel like a job at all. I’m excited to get out of bed in the morning and get started on my day.  I’m so lucky to be working with clients that I really care about; we get to share our mutual passion for food and a virtual smoothie every time they get another piece of PR for their fabulous food business.  I'm like a proud mother hen when I see them compete alongside the big boys with their big budgets.”

“I don’t think I could find this satisfaction in another corporate role.  I do care more about my clients than my own cash flow which probably means that Smoothie PR has grown a lot slower than is ideal, yet this organic approach means that I know every one of my Smoothies well and we really have become #TeamSmoothie.  On the back of this approach, Smoothie PR is steadily becoming more and more well-known and is doing well.”

“My main business motivation is being a small part of a team that helps my Smoothies to grow their brand, or in less official terms, I'm after the warm and fuzzies from each time they get their brand out there!  I’m not money motivated so that probably doesn't make me a brilliant businesswoman in the traditional sense.  But, my honest and passionate approach seems to have inadvertently given me my own USP. I follow my heart and give great service.

Any regrets?

“None. I had to go on my own crazy journey to get the experiences I needed to grow and change my new business.”

What one piece of advice would you give to anyone re-designing their midlife career?
“Find a way to take a leap into your dream – volunteer, start a side-hustle, work on your idea at the weekend, test and tweak it with the audience you're after to see if they have an appetite to pay for your goods or services. We all know that nothing in life is guaranteed but that having said that, you are guaranteed to have regrets if you don’t give it a go in some way.”

“Be brave and learn what truly matters most to you in your work life.”

If you too have a fabulous food business, find out how you can do your own PR in 10 mins a day for only £49pm at www.smoothiepr.com or follow @SmoothiePR on Twitter.

Louise Brogan - NHS IT Project Manager to Social Media Entrepreneur

“First time around, I would pick a business that I was genuinely passionate about or created a business doing something that I was truly good at."  

"I created a social media business which represents ALL OF ME:  the real technical geek, the person who loves teaching AND the person who loves learning.” 

Previous career overview

MSc Computing.  Several years at BT before a successful 10-year career in IT Project Management within the Health Service.

What triggered your career change/career re-design?

After yet another re-shuffle, Louise found herself in a senior but temporary role and when the re-shuffle settled there were no equally senior positions on offer.  Louise felt that she had no choice but to accept a lower grade position.  That didn’t sit well at all with her. 

“I felt under-valued, as if the wind had been taken out of my sails.” Louise very firmly felt that her decision to work part-time since the arrival of her first child had been taken advantage of.  These feelings strengthened her resolve to take the reins of her career fully into her own hands and resigned after 10 years with the company. 

What were the first steps you took to changing career?

The feeling that there had to be “something more” to work than her current career had been growing over the few years before her resignation.  Not being someone to sit on her laurels and wait for opportunities to come to her, Louise had set up a company 2 years before actually leaving her corporate job.   

“I saved everything I earned.  On my days off [from my part-time corporate role] I would squeeze as much work as was possible [in my own business] into the hours when the kids were at school or when my husband came home from work.”

While that first business was very different to Louise’s current business, it taught her all that she needed to know to evolve her business ideas. 

What did you learn during that process?

“I learned that you have to love what you do so that you can really thrive.  I thought I could make my first business work because I had noticed a gap in the market.  But I didn’t enjoy working in it like I love working in my current business.  It’s a whole different ball game.”

“My first business was a craft supplies shop which I started while I was on my first maternity leave.  By the time I had my third child, I had opened a retail shop thinking it was a way out of this corporate life.  I applied for help from a local business development scheme.   One of the advisors there was less convinced by my craft shop business, but she was really impressed with my social media knowledge and said that it was more advanced than most of the other business owners she had been working with.   That was it – the genius idea was born!   I closed up the shop and started my social media business.” 

Louise’s social media business has grown into the very successful (https://socialbeeni.com/) with a podcast, on-line courses and social media advice.

If you had to do it all again, what would you do differently?  Why?

“I wouldn’t have opened a craft shop!   I knew nothing about the business but I learned lots about buying from suppliers, selling and wholesaling which helps me mentor people in those industries now.   So, nothing I have learned has been wasted.”

“First time around, I would pick a business that I was genuinely passionate about or created a business doing something that I was truly good at.   I created a social media business which represents ALL OF ME:  the real technical geek, the person who loves teaching AND the person who loves learning.” 

 On the days that you KNOW you have made the right decision, how do you feel?

“On top of the world!”

“I can sit outside the school gates waiting to pick up my kids and do interviews or send emails.  My life feels so much more integrated.  I am making it all fit together - family and work.”

“It is very possible to have a very satisfying and enjoyable career between the hours of 9 and 2 every day – as long as you put a very high value on your time.  If it is important to you to be there to pick up the kids after school, then you have to be clever with time management – but it is completely do-able.”

Any regrets?

“I was gullible at the start.  I believed what people said.  I wasted time trusting people when my time was so precious.  I am much wiser now at picking who to meet and when to meet them than I was in the beginning.”

 “What one piece of advice would you give to anyone re-designing their midlife career?

“You’ve only one life!  And you have to take some risks.”